Tag Archives: Lawrence Knorr

Battle of Gettysburg participants honored in new book by Farrell, Farley, and Knorr

GETTYSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Keystone Tombstones: The Battle of Gettysburg by Joe Farrell, Joe Farley and Lawrence Knorr.This special volume highlights those individuals buried in Pennsylvania who contributed to the battle.

About the Book:
Biographies of famous people buried in Pennsylvabia who participated in the Battle of Gettysburg are the focus of this localized edition of Keystone Tombstones. Farrell and Farley have combed Pennsylvania to bring you the most entertaining tales about interesting people buried in Pennsylvania. Included in this volume:

• John Burns
• Gettysburg National Cemetery
• Amos Humiston
• Ginnie Wade
• Andrew Gregg Curtin
• James Buchanan
• Simon Cameron
• John White Geary
• John Fulton Reynolds
• Thaddeus Stevens
• George Meade
• Samuel W Crawford
• Oliver B Knowles
• Herman Haupt
• Samuel K Zook
• Dennis O’Kane
• Winfield Scott Hancock
• Strong Vincent
• Alfred L Pearson

Keystone Tombstones: The Battle of Gettysburg
Authored by Joe Farrell, Authored by Joe Farley, Authored by Lawrence Knorr
List Price: $14.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
122 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620068328
ISBN-10: 162006832X
BISAC: History / United States / Civil War

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Tombstones-Batt…

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“Wonder Boy” now available in paperback and ebook

SUNBURY, Pa.April 15, 2017PRLog — Lawrence Knorr’s Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib: The Youngest Player in American League History has been released by Sunbury Press in paperback and ebook.

About the Book:
Carl Scheib, from Gratz, PA, was a young farm boy of 16 who was signed to a major league contract by Connie Mack of the Philadelphia Athletics. Carl enjoyed 11 years in the major leagues, interrupted by his service in World War II. When he made his first appearance in 1943, he was the youngest player in modern major league history. The following season, Joe Nuxhall of the National League’s Cincinnati Reds, pitched 2/3 of an inning at age 15, breaking Carl’s major league record, but Carl retained his American League record.

Known as a good-hitting pitcher, Carl hit .396 in 1951 and .298 in 1948. He hit five home runs in his career, including a grand slam.

As a pitcher, Carl was a key hurler on the 1948 Philadelphia Athletics, going 14-8 during a tight pennant race. He also went 11-7 in 1952, and saved 11 games in 1951. Behind his “pitch- to-contact” approach, the A’s set the all-time record for double plays in a season with 217 in 1949, a record that still stands.

Wonder Boy chronicles the rapid raise of Carl Scheib from his high school days at Gratz and his contributions to Dalmatia in the West Branch League, to his subsequent major league career, facing such players as Joe DiMaggio, Bill Dickey, Ted Williams, Yogi Berra, Bobby Doerr, Satchel Paige, Bob Lemon, Larry Doby, Bob Feller, Luke Appling, Early Wynn, Mickey Mantle and many more.

About the Author:
Lawrence Knorr is an amateur historian with deep roots in the Pennsylvania Dutch Region. Lawrence has had a long career in information technology. He is the co-owner of Sunbury Press, Inc. and an adjunct Professor of Economics at Wilson College, Chambersburg, PA. Lawrence is a past President of the Mid Atlantic Book Publishers Association, and is currently a Board Member for the Pennsylvania German Society.

Lawrence lives with his wife Tammi and has two daughters a stepson and a stepdaughter.

Lawrence’s books include:

• Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib: The Youngest Player in American League History
• A Pennsylvania Mennonite and the California Gold Rush
• The Relations of Milton Snavely Hershey
• The Relations of Dwight D. Eisenhower
• The Decendents of Hans Peter Knorr
• The Hackman Story (with Dorothy Elaine Grace)
• General John Fulton Reynolds – His Biography, Words & Relations (with Michael Riley and Diane Watson)
• The Relations of Isaac F Stiely – Minister of the Mahantongo Valley
• There is Something About Rough and Ready – A History of the Village at the Heart of the Mahantongo Valley (with Steve E Troutman, Elaine Moran, Cindy Baum, Christine Hipple & Jeanne Adams)
• Keystone Tombstones Civil War (with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley)
• Modern Realism According to Fritz – The Oil Paintings of Fritz VonderHeiden
• Keystone Tombstones Susquehanna Valley (with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley)
• Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region (with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley)
• Keystone Tombstones Anthracite Region (with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley)

He is currently working on The Bang Story – From the Basement to the Big Lights.

Lawrence is also an accomplished photographer, known as Lawrence von Knorr, collaborating on the books Hells Kitchen Flea Market andWormleysburg: Jewel on the Susquehanna with his wife Tammi Knorr.  As T. K. McCoy, Tammi featured Lawrence’s work in three books entitled Photo Impressionism in the Digital Age, Pennsylvania Through the Seasons and Images of Italy.  Knorr’s work was also featured in Contemporary Photo Impressionists.  He provided the photograph’s for Melanie Simm’s poetry compilation Remember the Sun. For more information about Lawrence’s award-winning artwork, please see www.vonknorrgallery.com

Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib
Authored by Lawrence Knorr
List Price: $14.95
Hardcover: 240 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (March 30, 2017)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620068303
ISBN-13: 978-1620068304
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
SPO003030 SPORTS & RECREATION / Baseball / History
BIO016000 BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Sports
HIS036080 HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Wonder-Boy-The-Story-of-…

Lawrence Knorr’s remarks about “Wonder Boy” Carl Scheib at the Gratz Historical Society

Gratz, PA (July 7, 2016) — Former major league baseball player Carl Scheib, the subject of the recent biography Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History, traveled to his hometown of Gratz, Pennsylvania from his residence in San Antonio, Texas for a presentation and book signing on Thursday July 7th, 2016, held at the Gratz Community Center. The event was organized by the Gratz Historical Society. ABC27 from Harrisburg and The Citizen Standard covered the event, which was well-attended–over 120 people were present.

(Click here for the ABC27 story by Ross Lippman)

wb_fcFollowing is a transcript of the remarks made by Lawrence Knorr, the author or Wonder Boy:

Welcome everyone!  What a turnout!  Thank you so much for coming out this evening to support Carl Scheib. Carl, Sunbury Press, and the Gratz Historical Society all thank you for doing so.

My name is Lawrence Knorr. I am the author of Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History.  My ancestors are from the nearby Mahantongo Valley, near the village of Rough and Ready and Salem Church, just a few miles from here. I’ll never forget the first time I saw the valley, crossing over Mahantongo Moutain. At the peak, I looked out and saw the beautiful Mahantongo Valley before me with the Salem Church nestled below. It was a sight to see. I have collaborated in several books about the area, and as the owner of Sunbury Press, have published a number of books about the region, including those by Steve Troutman, whom many of you know.

So, many people have asked me … why write a book about Carl Scheib?  Some have even asked me if I did it because I was related to him.  The truth starts with a funny story.  A few years ago, while working with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley of the Keystone Tombstones series, which we publish, I was looking for interesting stories for their Sports volume.  I stumbled across Carl’s story online — the youngest player in modern history when he came up — and saw he was from Gratz, Pennsylvania. Given his age, I figured he was probably dead and buried in Pennsylvania. The Joes write about famous or noteworthy people buried in Pennsylvania.  So, I called the Joes and told them about Carl, and they were intrigued.  A few days later, I had dug further into Carl’s situation and found him alive and well in San Antonio, Texas. I called the Joes back and let them know Carl was off the list — he was still alive!  They expressed a little disappointment, and then I declared I would write his biography anyway.

I reached out to Carl with a letter and soon we were talking on the phone and via the mail. We agreed it would be best to meet in person at his home. My wife, Tammi, and I flew to San Antonio and spent three days with Carl reviewing his memorabilia and photographs and interviewing him about his life and his days in baseball.  We also attended a couple Texas League games at the Missions ballpark.  It was a lot of fun to watch a few games with Carl and talk about baseball.

The book took two years to write — part time — and was released by Sunbury Press last month. It relates the interesting story of Carl’s rise from high school ball to the major leagues at the age of 16, and recounts every major league appearance he made.

The story of Carl’s discovery, due to the actions of a local grocery clerk, Hannah Clark, and a traveling salesman, Al Grossman is somewhat apocryphal.  The story was repeated again in a recent news article in the Harrisburg paper.  What is not told is that Hannah was much more than a grocery clerk.  She was Carl’s cousin!  What also was not told accurately by Clifford Kachline back in 1948 in The Sporting News was story of Carl’s tryout. In those days, they embellished news stories to put a family-oriented spin on them. In the story, it was assumed Carl’s father drove him to the tryout in 1942, when Carl was 15. What he didn’t say was that Gummy Rothermal, an older pitcher on the Dalmatia team in the West Branch League drove Carl because he had a good car.  Can you imagine two young lads, in 1942, driving on the two lane roads from the valley to Philadelphia — over 100 miles — to try out for a major league team?  I can only imagine the conversation they had. I am sure Gummy hoped he’d get a tryout too, but that didn’t happen.

Carl had been a high school star in 9th, 10th, and 11th grades. Gratz won the baseball championship in 1941, and in 1942 with Carl as their ace pitcher. Carl was also invited to pitch for Dalmatia in the West Branch League … a town league of adult men who admitted teenage players during the war years.

Carl went to his tryout at Shibe Park in Philadelphia. It was raining that morning, and the game had been canceled. At first Carl thought the tryout was canceled too! But, after he found his way into the Athletics’ ballpark, he received his tryout in front of Connie Mack and others in the A’s brass. Connie told him to hurry back next year, after school was out.

LK headshot

Author Lawrence Knorr

Carl went home and did just that. The following spring, in 1943, after school was out, he quit high school and headed to Philadelphia. He initially was a batting practice pitcher, and then began taking trips on the train with the team. By September, he was ready to go, and signed a contract. At this point, his father came from Gratz to co-sign, since he was underage. Carl then entered his first game that day — against the New York Yankees!

When he walked onto the field, Carl was the youngest player in modern major league history.  There had been some younger players back in the 1800s, but no one as young as Carl, at 16 years, had played major league baseball since. He was used sparingly in relief the rest of the way and had respectable numbers. The next year, a 15 year old named Joe Nuxhall threw less than an inning of crappy ball giving up five runs on five walks and two hits. Nuxhall then went to the minors and did not return for seven years!  Carl stuck in the big leagues and got better and better. Personally, I think there should be an asterisk next to Nuxhall’s appearance, but it is, what it is. Carl is still the youngest player to have ever appeared in the American League.

Carl was with the A’s the whole season in 1944, and then when he turned 18, in 1945, he was drafted into the Army early that season. Fortunately, the war was ending when Carl went off to Germany as one of the occupation troops. He was stationed at Nuremburg during the trials. He participated on two different teams in the Army, and won nearly all of his games, including the GI championship in Germany.

Upon his return in 1947, Carl was back with the A’s and continued what many would say was just an “average” major league career. But I disagree. Carl played 11 seasons at the highest level of his sport. Not many players do that. He had not played in the minor leagues before coming to the majors, and had performed very well at a very young age. Anyone who makes a major league is one of the top players in the sport, and Carl played at that level for over a decade. So no, Carl was not a hall-of-famer, or a World Series winner, or an All-Star, but he was a solid performer for many years, who did some remarkable things, some of which I will talk about in a few minutes.

So, why is Carl Scheib’s career important? I’ll give you eight reasons:

  1. Connie Mack — Connie Mack was involved with the Philadelphia A’s from their beginning, and spent over 50 years in baseball from the late 1800s into the 1950s. His teams in the early 20th century were the “Yankees” before the Yankees became good. Carl was signed and managed by Connie Mack, one of the all-time greats. So, Carl’s career, thanks to Mack, bridges all the way back to the early days of major league baseball, and carries into the golden era.
  2. World War II — Many players got their opportunities to play thanks to a lot of the players entering the service. Carl was someone who benefited from this situation. This is an interesting era in baseball history, which has been studied quite a bit. Quite a few of these players were older and were called up from the minors to play. Many of their careers ended when the boys came home. Carl was not one of them. He stuck — and got better when the best players were back.
  3. A’s last pennant race — The A’s were in Philadelphia until the late 1950s, when they moved to Kansas City and then onto Oakland. We now know them as the Oakland A’s and many can remember the great teams of the 1970s. But the Kansas City A’s never were in the pennant race, so it was the 1948 A’s of Philadelphia, who last challenged for the lead. This team was in first place as late as August, with Carl as one of their star pitchers having his best season. Even after the A’s faded, Carl continued to pitch well as the Indians, Red Sox, and Yankees battled for the championship. The last week of the season, Carl beat the Yankees, denying them the pennant, allowing the Indians to win. Under pressure, Carl was brilliant, and was somewhat of a Yankee-killer at that time.
  4. Integration — Carl played through the era when baseball became integrated — when Jackie Robinson entered the National League, and Larry Doby entered the American League. Carl faced Doby on a number of occasions, and usually didn’t do too well against him. The A’s hired a heckler to harass Doby when he was in Philadelphia. Some of it was good-natured, but a lot of it was shameful and mean. In fact, Carl related in the book that the other players were hard on the African-American players, treating them very badly. Carl felt sorry for them.
  5. All-Time Greats — Carl got to meet some of the all-time great ballplayers.  He was coached by Chief Bender, and Al Simmons. He also met Babe Ruth during Connie Mack’s celebration of 50 years in baseball. So, Carl interacted with some of the greatest old-time ballplayers.
  6. Opponents — Carl played against some of the greatest players of all time during baseball’s golden era, and often got the better of them. He faced Ted Williams, Joe Dimaggio, Yogi Berra, Larry Doby, Mickey Mantle, and many more. On the mound, his opponents were Satchel Paige, Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Hal Newhouser, and others.
  7. Did Great Things — Carl threw complete game shutouts, hit a grand slam against the White Sox, hit four other major league homeruns, had many clutch wins and saves, and even clutch hits as a batter.
  8. Good hitter — Carl was a good-hitting pitcher. He could have been an outfielder, and played in the outfield in a couple games. He was also a key pinch hitter. One year he hit .396 — in over 50 at bats — in the major leagues.  This is tough to do! He was a lifetime .250 hitter. One game in particular made me laugh. It was really remarkable. Carl was pitching a complete game. It was tied into the bottom of the 9th. With a couple men on base, guess who came up to bat — Carl. Now, these days, how likely is it that a manager is going to allow the pitcher to bat in the bottom of the 9th of a tie game. This doesn’t happen anymore!  Ever!  So, Carl is allowed to bat, and what does he do? He gets the game-winning walk-off hit!  I looked into this a little bit, and I don’t know of any other instances where a starting pitcher, throwing a complete game, has the walk-off hit to end the game. It certainly hasn’t happened in quite awhile, if at all.  Admittedly, I didn’t look too hard, but it is remarkable nonetheless.  In another game, in the minor leagues, near the end of his career, the manager was thrown out of the game for some reason, and Carl being one of the older players on the team, was asked to manage the rest of the way.  Along comes the bottom of the 9th, and the game is tied. There are a couple of men on. Guess who Carl, the manager, inserts as a pinch-hitter? Himself! And, guess what he did? He got a hit – a walk-off hit to win the game.

So, in summary, Carl was simply a great country ballplayer. On better teams, or with better management, or modern technology, I am sure he would have had an even better, and perhaps longer career. Carl truly was and is the “Wonder Boy” from Gratz!

Thank you ….

“Hass” Hassenger then spoke for a few minutes. He is the only other surviving member from the Gratz HS championship teams. He reminisced about the old days when they were boys playing ball in the valley.

Carl Scheib then answered questions and told jokes and stories for about 45 minutes.

(The entire program was recorded on video by The Gratz Historical Society and is available on DVD from them.)

Copies of the book Wonder Boy, and all other Sunbury Press books can be purchased wherever books are sold. A few signed copies will be offered by The Gratz Historical Society while supplies last. The book can also be purchased directly from Sunbury Press at:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Wonder-Boy-The-Story-of-Carl-Scheib-9781620064139.htm

Carl Scheib to appear in Gratz

Gratz, PA — Former major league pitcher Carl Scheib, who is the youngest player in American League history, having taken the mound for Connie Mack’s Philadelphia A’s in 1943 at the age of 16, will be at the Gratz Community Center July 7th, 2016 at 7 PM. Carl’s biographer, Lawrence Knorr, will present his latest book Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib: The Youngest Player in American League History. Lawrence and Carl will then answer questions and sign copies of the book which will be for sale through the Gratz Historical Society. Carl will then donate some of his memorabilia to the Gratz Historical Society Museum.

ABOUT THE BOOK

wb_fcCarl Scheib, from Gratz, PA, was a young farm boy of 16 who was signed to a major league contract by Connie Mack of the Philadelphia Athletics. Carl enjoyed 11 years in the major leagues, interrupted by his service in World War II. When he made his first appearance in 1943, he was the youngest player in modern major league history. The following season, Joe Nuxhall of the National League’s Cincinnati Reds, pitched 2/3 of an inning at age 15, breaking Carl’s major league record, but Carl retained his American League record.

Known as a good-hitting pitcher, Carl hit .396 in 1951 and .298 in 1948. He hit five home runs in his career, including a grand slam.

As a pitcher, Carl was a key hurler on the 1948 Philadelphia Athletics, going 14-8 during a tight pennant race. He also went 11-7 in 1952, and saved 11 games in 1951. Behind his “pitch- to-contact” approach, the A’s set the all-time record for double plays in a season with 217 in 1949, a record that still stands.

Wonder Boy chronicles the rapid rise of Carl Scheib from his high school days at Gratz and his contributions to Dalmatia in the West Branch League, to his subsequent major league career, facing such players as Joe DiMaggio, Bill Dickey, Ted Williams, Yogi Berra, Bobby Doerr, Satchel Paige, Bob Lemon, Larry Doby, Bob Feller, Luke Appling, Early Wynn, Mickey Mantle and many more.

This volume is 240 pages

Format – hardcover w/dust jacket

black and white photos. 6 x 9

ISBN:  9781620064139

Price: $24.95

SPO003030 SPORTS & RECREATION / Baseball / History

BIO016000 BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Sports

HIS036080 HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic

Ike’s Pennsylvania German roots detailed

trodde_fcMECHANICSBURG, Pa.  — Sunbury Press has released The Relations of Dwight D. Eisenhower: His Pennsylvania German Roots, by Lawrence Knorr. Over 3500 relatives are detailed.

About the Book:
Dwight D. Eisenhower had many direct ancestors who lived in the Susquehanna Valley area of Pennsylvania and eastward. This volume tracks the former president’s lineage back to Germany and England and focuses on those descendants from the lines who lived in Pennsylvania. Over 3500 relations are detailed, including the Matters, Rombergers, Eisenhauers, Boones, Millers and many more.

Contents:
Preface to the 2nd Edition
Introduction
The Ancestors of Dwight David Eisenhower
Photos of Ike’s Parents and Siblings
Photos of Young Ike
Photos of Ike at War & as President
Photos of Ike, Mamie & Family
The Descendents of Hans Nicholas Eisenhauer
Matter Photos
The Descendents of Johannes Matter
Balthasar Romberger Photos
Romberger Photos
The Descendents of Johann Bartholomus Romberger
The Descendents of John Jacob Miller
The Descendents of George Michael Boone
Kinship Overview
Kinship Report of Dwight David Eisenhower

About the Author:
Lawrence Knorr is an amateur genealogist with deep roots in the Pennsylvania Dutch Region. Lawrence has had a 33-year career in information technology. He is also the co-owner of Sunbury Press, Inc., the owner of 2nd Floor Gallery, Inc., and an adjunct professor of Economics and Finance at Wilson College.

Lawrence holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business/Economics (History Minor) from Wilson College and a Masters of Business Administration from Penn State. He is also a Certified Computer Professional, Project Management Professional, and Certified Scrum Master. Lawrence lives with his wife Tammi and has two daughters a stepson and a stepdaughter.

He is the author or co-author of the following books:

Keystone Tombstones Anthracite Region (2015), (co-author) Sunbury Press
Keystone Tombstones Susquehanna Valley (2015), (co-author) Sunbury Press
Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region (2015), (co-author) Sunbury Press
How I Got into Hollywood (2014), (co-author) Sunbury Press
Keystone Tombstones Civil War (2013), (co-author) Sunbury Press
There is Something About Rough & Ready (2013), (co-author) Sunbury Press
General John Fulton Reynolds (2012), (co-author) Sunbury Press
The Hackman Story (2011), (co-author) Sunbury Press
The Relations of Dwight D. Eisenhower (2011), Sunbury Press
The Relations of Isaac F. Stiely (2011), Sunbury Press
A Pennsylvania Mennonite and the California Gold Rush (2008), Sunbury Press
The Relations of Milton Hershey, 4th Edition (2007), Sunbury Press
The Descendants of Hans Peter Knorr  (2007), Sunbury Press
Seventy-One Years of Marriage: The Ancestors and Descendents of George and Alice Knorr of Reading, PA (2003), Self-Published.

The Relations of Dwight D Eisenhower: His Pennsylvania German Roots
Authored by Lawrence Knorr
List Price: $19.95
8″ x 10″ (20.32 x 25.4 cm)
Black & White on White paper
312 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067307
ISBN-10: 1620067307
BISAC: History / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Relations-of-Dwight-…

“Pit Bulls” top Christmas gift! — Sunbury Press bestsellers for December 2014

MECHANICSBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for December, 2014. Tony Julian’s compilation of historic photos Pit Bulls was #1.

About Pit Bulls

Pit Bulls

Pit Bulls

Vintage Photographs of Pit Bulls and the People Who Loved Them.

Author Anthony Julian opens a time capsule for us concerning the history of the oft-maligned Pit Bull.  Through old photographs and personal anecdotes, Julian paints a history of the breed very different from the contemporary misconceptions flamed by the popular media fear machine. He focuses on the history of the Pit Bull in American society, including acting as sentry over dead Civil War soldiers and co-star on “The Little Rascals.”  This book is lavishly illustrated with vintage photographs.

This is the first in a series of books showcasing vintage photographs of people with their beloved pit bulls. $1 from the sale of each book goes to pit bull rescues !

SUNBURY PRESS – Bestsellers for December, 2014 (by Revenue)
Rank Last Month Title Author Category
1 13 Pit Bulls Anthony Julian History
2 Geology of the Mahanoy, Mahantongo and Lykens Valleys Steve Troutman Earth History
3 9 Visions of Teaoga Jim Remsen YA Fiction
4 5 As the Paint Dries Carrie Wissler-Thomas Art History
5 A Pennsylvania Mennonite and the California Gold Rush Lawrence Knorr History
6 The Relations of Dwight D Eisenhower Lawrence Knorr Genealogy
7 NEW Forts, Forests, and Flintlocks John L. Moore History
8 15 A Brother’s Cold Case Dennis Herrick Thriller Fiction
9 12 Call Sign Dracula Joe Fair War Memoir
10 8 Poor Will’s Almanack 2015 Bill Felker Almanac
11 10 Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last Mike Campbell History
12 The Relations of Isaac F Stiely: Minister of the Mahantongo Valley Lawrence Knorr Local History
13 11 Head Over Wheels Ken Mercurio Sports Memoir
14 The Complete Story of the Worldwide Invasion of the Orange Orbs Terry Ray Paranormal
15 The Hackman Story Knorr & Grace Family History
16 16 Keystone Tombstones Civil War Farrell, Farley & Knorr War Biography
17 General John Fulton Reynolds Knorr, Riley & Watson Biography
18 Winter of the Metal People Dennis Herrick Historical Fiction
19 Modern Realism According to Fritz Lawrence Knorr Art History
20 The Relations of Milton Snavely Hershey Lawrence Knorr Genealogy

Sunbury Press had its best fourth quarter ever, up nearly 50% from the 4th quarter of 2013. For the month, sales were up 45% as compared to the same month last year. Year-to-date, sales are up over 20% overall. Simply put, the company had its best year ever. Trade paperback sales soared 24% in 2014. Hardcover sales since June have rocketed past eBook sales, which were down over 15% for the year. There appears to have been no Christmas rebound for eBooks.

gotmmalv_fcTony Julian’s Pit Bulls, available in both trade paperback and hardcover, led the pack thanks to achieving consistently-high Amazon category rankings and due to the $1 per book donation pledge by the publisher. Steve Troutman’s Geology of the Mahanoy, Mahantongo and Lykens Valleys grabbed #2 thanks to author activities. Jim Remsen’s Visions of Teaga moved up to #3 as a result of ongoing author promotions. As the Paint Dries, Carrie Wissler-Thomas’s history of the Art Association of Harrisburg, co-authored by Michael Barton, notched up to #4 due to bookstore sales in Harrisburg and Christmas sales at the Association. Lawrence Knorr grabbed seven spots in the top 20 due to multiple television and radio appearances: #5 A Pennsylvania Mennonite and the California Gold Rush, #6The Relations of Dwight D. Eisenhower, #12 The Relations of Isaac F. Stiely: Minister of the Mahantongo Valley, #15 The Hackman Story, with the late Dorothy Grace, #16 with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley Keystone Tombstones Civil War, #17 General John Fulton Reynolds co-authored with Michael Riley and Diane Watson, #19 Modern Realism According to Fritz, and #20 The Relations of Milton Snavely Hershey. John L. Moore’s latest in the Frontier Pennsylvania Series, Forts, Forests, and Flintlocks debuted at #7 due to sales at regional retail outlets. A Brother’s Cold Case, by Dennis Herrick, moved up to #8 thanks to author activities. He also nabbed #18 with Winter of the Metal People. Joe Fair’s Vietnam memoir Call Sign Dracula climbed the rankings to #9 thanks to author appearances. Bill Felker’s Poor Will’s Almanack 2015 slipped a bit to #10 thanks to sales from the author’s annual buyers. Mike Campbell’s Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last held at #11 due to national media attention for the search for the aviatrix’s plane. Head Over Wheels, Ken Mercurio’s cycling memoir slipped to #13, It continues to receive strong interest from cycling enthusiasts. Terry Ray’s The Complete Story of the Worldwide Invasion of the Orange Orbs returned to the rankings at #14 due to attention from MUFON.

The company released eight new titles during the month of December:

SUNBURY PRESS – New Releases for December, 2014
Pioneers, Prisoners, and Peace Pipes John L. Moore History
Forts, Forests, and Flintlocks John L. Moore History
Rivers, Raiders, and Renegades John L. Moore History
Cannons, Cattle, and Campfires John L. Moore History
Settlers, Soldiers, and Scalps John L. Moore History
Warriors, Wampum, and Wolves John L. Moore History
Pink Flamingos All Around (hardcover) Matthew Anderson Childrens Fiction
Flying Pants Lola James Childrens Fiction

For a list of Sunbury’s best-sellers, please see the Sunbury Press web site:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/BESTSELLERS_c3.htm
For a complete list of recent and upcoming releases, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/COMING-SOON_c47.htm

Meet Sunbury Press’ Owner Lawrence Knorr! by Tammy Burke

http://glvwgwritersconference.blogspot.com/2014/03/meet-sunbury-press-owner-lawrence-knorr.html

LvK by Tammi KnorrHow delightful having you back at the “Write Stuff” conference again! And wow! Is it coming up fast. Anything new and exciting you can share regarding you and/or the Sunbury Press?  
 
Lawrence Knorr: Yes!  It is an honor to be asked back. It is hard to believe two years have passed since the last time! Sunbury Press just completed its best year ever from a sales perspective. We continue to grow and succeed in a very tough, competitive environment. We are celebrating our tenth year in business in 2014 — but I can tell you it feels like 100 years! We’ve transformed ourselves twice in that span — caterpillar, cocoon, butterfly — what’s next? Most recently, we have seen ebooks peak, their growth rate slowing, while independent bookstore sales have picked up. While our Amazon business has continued to grow, other channels are growing faster. We have dubbed 2014 our “Year of Collaboration” focusing on ways our 120+ authors can experience better results by helping each other and by working together in teams. So far, there has been a lot of positive energy. We also opened, February 1, our first company bookstore in Mechanicsburg, PA, where our headquarters is located. Our goal was to provide a storefront for all of our books — and a venue for our authors to meet the public. We really want to be an important part of the local community for our local and regional authors — and provide another option to our more far flung partners. It’s a great place to meet prospective authors and to talk about books with the general public.
Based on your webpage, I understand the your company holds a “Continue the Enlightenment” mentality from the 18th 3609278century and the “Age of Reason.” Could you expand more what that means to you and to the Sunbury Press?
 
Lawrence Knorr: “Continue the Enlightenment” is a motto that represents our mission statement. Simply put, we are a publisher of diverse categories, but we are always seeking to bring new perspectives and voices to the marketplace. The Enlightenment was about a new order of things — not unlike what is happening in publishing today. The old order governed by a strong center of control is being challenged by more democratic ideals. This is what the independent publishing movement is all about — whether doing it yourself or with an independent publisher. We are experiencing an era of rapid democratization of the publishing industry. If only Hugh Fox had lived a little longer! I’ll never forget the day he called me – Hugh Fox – one of the founders of the Pushcart Prize. He revealed he was dying of cancer and offered me the opportunity to publish his remaining works. He said Sunbury Press was exactly the kind of publisher he was looking for. I was very grateful for his offer, and encouraged him to spread the dozen or so works around to other presses, keeping two of them for ourselves. Hugh liked the motto, and we think it is very appropriate at this time.
What was the motivation to start the Sunbury Press? What makes it different than other publishing companies?
 
Lawrence Knorr: I started the company in 2004 because I wanted to publish some family histories. I didn’t want to pay someone else to do it, so I Ambit_Island_Series.inddembarked on figuring out how. While this was only ten years ago, it was when vanity presses were a cottage industry and print on demand and ebooks were in their infancy. I just wanted to sell some books at cost to family members. But, I really enjoyed it and realized I could publish other books — not just my own. Two hundred and twenty titles and one hundred and twenty authors later, we have really grown thanks to our business model and our philosophy. We are different for several reasons:
1) We are very tech-savvy. My wife and I both have long careers in IT and understand the Age of Content and the importance of search engines, ecommerce and mobile commerce.
2) We do NOT charge for services. Many publishers are experimenting with vanity, hybrid or subsidy models. We refuse to go in this direction, instead making our money by selling books.
3) We have editors working for us as employees of our company. We take quality very seriously.
4) My wife and I are also photographers and digital artists, able to design book covers, marketing materials, graphic designs, web content, etc.
5) We are “generalist opportunists” — working in a broad number of categories. We understand the advantages of breadth and scale to the economic sustainability of an enterprise.
6) We love what we do. I really enjoy working with authors to bring their work to the marketplace. It tickles the soul.
 
tsarr_pubI was wondering…Is there anything in particular you are looking for in an author and his or her manuscript?
 
Lawrence Knorr: Quality Manuscript + Motivated Author + Publisher = Success
We are always looking for high quality manuscripts — in a variety of fiction and nonfiction categories. Quality is more than just well-written / grammatically correct. Quality is about fresh ideas, new found truths and entertainment. We like material that brings value to our readers.
We like to gauge an author’s motivations. Gone are the days of sitting at a typewriter, mailing a box of paper to a publisher and then waiting by the door for the checks to arrive. Authors need to be involved in their success. While we provide editing, design, formatting, ebook creation, printing, distribution, marketing, etc., we do best when authors are out and about advocating their work and promoting themselves. We are an ideal option for authors whose work is good enough not to have to pay to publish — who want to be writers and not start their own publishing businesses. Most writers are not business savvy. We bring the business expertise to the mix.
 
Anything you’d like to see more of? Anything you’d like to see less of?
 
ktcw_pubLawrence Knorr: Thankfully, the vampire craze has past. There’s probably a metaphor somewhere in that regarding the publishing industry! We are always looking for more history and historical fiction — more clever YA and more entertaining police procedurals and mysteries. We like good literary fiction too! We’ve had a lot of inquiries about poetry — something we rarely publish.
 
Do you work with authors to help them increase sales? Or do you allow them to do that for themselves?
 
Lawrence Knorr: We generate our revenue exclusively from selling books. So, we are ALWAYS looking for ways to sell more books — whether a new channel to open, a new retailer to call upon, a new country to access, or an author’s activities. As I stated in the opening, we have dubbed 2014 the “Year of Collaboration” and are seeking new ways to collectively leverage our scale. There are opportunities for Sunbury Press authors to go beyond our activities and their individual efforts — to work together within a category or region.
 
I understand you have authored eight books on regional history. Could you tell us more about them? What were their inspiration.  
 
JFR_fcLawrence Knorr: Where did I ever find the time? My early books: “The Descendants of Hans Peter Knorr,” “The Relations of Milton Snavely Hershey,” “The Relations of Isaac F Stiehly,” “General John Fulton Reynolds,” “The Relations of Dwight D Eisenhower” and “The Hackman Story” were family history / genealogy focused. I wanted to write about my relations — a very deep and rich history linked to important people and events in Pennsylvania and the nation. While researching at the Lancaster County Historical Society, I also stumbled upon the journal and letters of my great uncle David Bear Hackman, describing his adventure to California for the Gold Rush. I edited and contextualized this treasure into the book “A Pennsylvania Mennonite and the California Gold Rush.” My more recent works have been collaborations:  “Keystone Tombstones Civil War” with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley — about famous people buried in Pennsylvania who played a part in the Civil War and “There is Something About Rough and Ready” about the village in the heart of the Mahantongo Valley at the center of that region’s Pennsylvania Dutch culture. I have several other projects under way for release in the coming years: “The Visiting Physician of Red Cross” – about the career of Dr. Reuben Muth of Red Cross, PA (I have his collection of visiting doctor records from 1850 to 1890), “Palmetto Tombstones” — about famous people buried in South Carolina, “Scheib of Shibe Park” — a biography of the former Philadelphia A’s pitcher — and youngest American Leaguer ever — Carl Scheib of Gratz, PA.
 
Being born and raised in the Susquehanna Valley myself I was wondering if you’ve done anything regarding Sunbury, particularly the Hotel Edison or Lewisburg?
 
Lawrence Knorr: We borrowed the name Sunbury from the town in Pennsylvania because it was near the Mahantongo Valley — and I liked the name. But, that’s about as far as it goes. We have yet to publish anything about Sunbury, the town in Pennsylvania or nearby Lewisburg. However, our book “Digging Dusky Diamonds” by John Lindermuth is about Shamokin, PA and the nearby coal regions. Our best-selling “Prohibition’s Prince” is about the famous moonshiner Prince Farrington from Williamsport, PA.  Our “Keystone Tombstones” series spans the entire state and often touches on historical figures from the Susquehanna Valley.
 
Do you have favorite time period and place regarding history?
 
Lawrence Knorr: I teach Comparative Economic and Political Systems at Wilson College once a year. I really enjoy teaching this class because it allows me to span economic history from classical times to present. My favorite time periods / places are the Roman Empire in the first few centuries AD and 19th and early 20th century America. I am intrigued by our industrialization in the early 1800s — and the entrepreneurship and personal responsibility that was present. Most of the people living today would feel very insecure without their comforts, insurances and government safety nets. I long for that time when individual hard work and creativity could amount to something tangible — and when we relied on ourselves, our families, our religious institutions and our communities.
 
What did you like best about holding the office of president for MidAtlantic Book Publishers Association (MBPA)?
 
Lawrence Knorr: I was honored to be elected the President of MBPA for one year. I met a lot of great people, including my predecessor Mary Shafer. My goal was to make sure our organization survived the struggles it was going through and could become sustainable. The new team that formed was very motivated to do so, and they continue on without me. Unfortunately, the demands of my growing business prevent me from volunteering at this time.
Your digital photography is quite beautiful. I particularly enjoy your vibrant use of color. How long have you been practicing this art and I’m curious…how many book covers have you designed?
 
Lawrence Knorr: Thank you! I’ve been a photographer since I was 12 years old. I began showing my work in 2006, after a local gallery liked my attempts at “Photo Impressionism.” I was one of the pioneer artists who was trying to make photographs look like paintings. My work has been shown around the country and has won awards — and is in collections and even a museum or two. While I have not been as active at showing my work, I have designed over 100 book covers over the last three years. My wife says they are getting better!  I really enjoy doing it, and most of the authors are very pleased with the results.
 
What are your thoughts on selling internationally? Do you find that foreign bookstores cater to the same reading choices as here in our area?
 
Lawrence Knorr: We sell our books in at least a dozen other countries — UK, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Japan, Australia, India, Mexico, Canada, Brazil, Taiwan … even Lebanon! We’re developing expertise in foreign rights as well as foreign distribution. We have found the rest of the world lags the US in eBook adoption — and still have a very strong book retailers. We’ve had the most success in the UK, for obvious reasons – but have also broken through where our titles touch on target markets.
 
I want to thank you for taking time out for this interview, Lawrence. We look forward to seeing you soon!
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Lawrence Knorr has been involved with book publishing for fourteen years. His  company, Sunbury Press, Inc., headquartered in Mechanicsburg, PA, is a publisher of trade paperback and digital books featuring established and emerging authors  in many fiction and nonfiction categories. Sunbury’s books are printed in the USA and sold through leading booksellers worldwide. Sunbury currently has over  120 authors and 200 titles under management.
Lawrence has taught business and project management courses for ten years, and is the author of eight books. He is also an award-winning digital artist, and has designed dozens of book covers . Lawrence is the former President of the MidAtlantic Book Publishers Association (MBPA)
Most interested in U.S. & World history and other nonfiction (sports,
professional, hobbies) — also historical fiction, mystery/thriller.

Will consider YA fiction, contemporary and historical romance, horror (no
vampires), literary fiction.

Not looking for children’s picture books and poetry at this time.

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Tammy Burke, GLVWG member, 2011 conference chair and past president, has published around 400 newspaper and regional magazine articles. She has interviewed state and local government officials, business and community leaders, everyday folk and celebrities, in addition to helping write scripts for over a dozen television commercials and writing various business communications. Currently, she is in the revision stage for her first YA fantasy adventure book, the first in an intended series. When not writing, she works in the social service field and is a fencing marshal in the Society of Creative Anachronism (SCA).