Category Archives: media appearances

Lawrence Knorr’s remarks about “Wonder Boy” Carl Scheib at the Gratz Historical Society

Gratz, PA (July 7, 2016) — Former major league baseball player Carl Scheib, the subject of the recent biography Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History, traveled to his hometown of Gratz, Pennsylvania from his residence in San Antonio, Texas for a presentation and book signing on Thursday July 7th, 2016, held at the Gratz Community Center. The event was organized by the Gratz Historical Society. ABC27 from Harrisburg and The Citizen Standard covered the event, which was well-attended–over 120 people were present.

(Click here for the ABC27 story by Ross Lippman)

wb_fcFollowing is a transcript of the remarks made by Lawrence Knorr, the author or Wonder Boy:

Welcome everyone!  What a turnout!  Thank you so much for coming out this evening to support Carl Scheib. Carl, Sunbury Press, and the Gratz Historical Society all thank you for doing so.

My name is Lawrence Knorr. I am the author of Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History.  My ancestors are from the nearby Mahantongo Valley, near the village of Rough and Ready and Salem Church, just a few miles from here. I’ll never forget the first time I saw the valley, crossing over Mahantongo Moutain. At the peak, I looked out and saw the beautiful Mahantongo Valley before me with the Salem Church nestled below. It was a sight to see. I have collaborated in several books about the area, and as the owner of Sunbury Press, have published a number of books about the region, including those by Steve Troutman, whom many of you know.

So, many people have asked me … why write a book about Carl Scheib?  Some have even asked me if I did it because I was related to him.  The truth starts with a funny story.  A few years ago, while working with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley of the Keystone Tombstones series, which we publish, I was looking for interesting stories for their Sports volume.  I stumbled across Carl’s story online — the youngest player in modern history when he came up — and saw he was from Gratz, Pennsylvania. Given his age, I figured he was probably dead and buried in Pennsylvania. The Joes write about famous or noteworthy people buried in Pennsylvania.  So, I called the Joes and told them about Carl, and they were intrigued.  A few days later, I had dug further into Carl’s situation and found him alive and well in San Antonio, Texas. I called the Joes back and let them know Carl was off the list — he was still alive!  They expressed a little disappointment, and then I declared I would write his biography anyway.

I reached out to Carl with a letter and soon we were talking on the phone and via the mail. We agreed it would be best to meet in person at his home. My wife, Tammi, and I flew to San Antonio and spent three days with Carl reviewing his memorabilia and photographs and interviewing him about his life and his days in baseball.  We also attended a couple Texas League games at the Missions ballpark.  It was a lot of fun to watch a few games with Carl and talk about baseball.

The book took two years to write — part time — and was released by Sunbury Press last month. It relates the interesting story of Carl’s rise from high school ball to the major leagues at the age of 16, and recounts every major league appearance he made.

The story of Carl’s discovery, due to the actions of a local grocery clerk, Hannah Clark, and a traveling salesman, Al Grossman is somewhat apocryphal.  The story was repeated again in a recent news article in the Harrisburg paper.  What is not told is that Hannah was much more than a grocery clerk.  She was Carl’s cousin!  What also was not told accurately by Clifford Kachline back in 1948 in The Sporting News was story of Carl’s tryout. In those days, they embellished news stories to put a family-oriented spin on them. In the story, it was assumed Carl’s father drove him to the tryout in 1942, when Carl was 15. What he didn’t say was that Gummy Rothermal, an older pitcher on the Dalmatia team in the West Branch League drove Carl because he had a good car.  Can you imagine two young lads, in 1942, driving on the two lane roads from the valley to Philadelphia — over 100 miles — to try out for a major league team?  I can only imagine the conversation they had. I am sure Gummy hoped he’d get a tryout too, but that didn’t happen.

Carl had been a high school star in 9th, 10th, and 11th grades. Gratz won the baseball championship in 1941, and in 1942 with Carl as their ace pitcher. Carl was also invited to pitch for Dalmatia in the West Branch League … a town league of adult men who admitted teenage players during the war years.

Carl went to his tryout at Shibe Park in Philadelphia. It was raining that morning, and the game had been canceled. At first Carl thought the tryout was canceled too! But, after he found his way into the Athletics’ ballpark, he received his tryout in front of Connie Mack and others in the A’s brass. Connie told him to hurry back next year, after school was out.

LK headshot

Author Lawrence Knorr

Carl went home and did just that. The following spring, in 1943, after school was out, he quit high school and headed to Philadelphia. He initially was a batting practice pitcher, and then began taking trips on the train with the team. By September, he was ready to go, and signed a contract. At this point, his father came from Gratz to co-sign, since he was underage. Carl then entered his first game that day — against the New York Yankees!

When he walked onto the field, Carl was the youngest player in modern major league history.  There had been some younger players back in the 1800s, but no one as young as Carl, at 16 years, had played major league baseball since. He was used sparingly in relief the rest of the way and had respectable numbers. The next year, a 15 year old named Joe Nuxhall threw less than an inning of crappy ball giving up five runs on five walks and two hits. Nuxhall then went to the minors and did not return for seven years!  Carl stuck in the big leagues and got better and better. Personally, I think there should be an asterisk next to Nuxhall’s appearance, but it is, what it is. Carl is still the youngest player to have ever appeared in the American League.

Carl was with the A’s the whole season in 1944, and then when he turned 18, in 1945, he was drafted into the Army early that season. Fortunately, the war was ending when Carl went off to Germany as one of the occupation troops. He was stationed at Nuremburg during the trials. He participated on two different teams in the Army, and won nearly all of his games, including the GI championship in Germany.

Upon his return in 1947, Carl was back with the A’s and continued what many would say was just an “average” major league career. But I disagree. Carl played 11 seasons at the highest level of his sport. Not many players do that. He had not played in the minor leagues before coming to the majors, and had performed very well at a very young age. Anyone who makes a major league is one of the top players in the sport, and Carl played at that level for over a decade. So no, Carl was not a hall-of-famer, or a World Series winner, or an All-Star, but he was a solid performer for many years, who did some remarkable things, some of which I will talk about in a few minutes.

So, why is Carl Scheib’s career important? I’ll give you eight reasons:

  1. Connie Mack — Connie Mack was involved with the Philadelphia A’s from their beginning, and spent over 50 years in baseball from the late 1800s into the 1950s. His teams in the early 20th century were the “Yankees” before the Yankees became good. Carl was signed and managed by Connie Mack, one of the all-time greats. So, Carl’s career, thanks to Mack, bridges all the way back to the early days of major league baseball, and carries into the golden era.
  2. World War II — Many players got their opportunities to play thanks to a lot of the players entering the service. Carl was someone who benefited from this situation. This is an interesting era in baseball history, which has been studied quite a bit. Quite a few of these players were older and were called up from the minors to play. Many of their careers ended when the boys came home. Carl was not one of them. He stuck — and got better when the best players were back.
  3. A’s last pennant race — The A’s were in Philadelphia until the late 1950s, when they moved to Kansas City and then onto Oakland. We now know them as the Oakland A’s and many can remember the great teams of the 1970s. But the Kansas City A’s never were in the pennant race, so it was the 1948 A’s of Philadelphia, who last challenged for the lead. This team was in first place as late as August, with Carl as one of their star pitchers having his best season. Even after the A’s faded, Carl continued to pitch well as the Indians, Red Sox, and Yankees battled for the championship. The last week of the season, Carl beat the Yankees, denying them the pennant, allowing the Indians to win. Under pressure, Carl was brilliant, and was somewhat of a Yankee-killer at that time.
  4. Integration — Carl played through the era when baseball became integrated — when Jackie Robinson entered the National League, and Larry Doby entered the American League. Carl faced Doby on a number of occasions, and usually didn’t do too well against him. The A’s hired a heckler to harass Doby when he was in Philadelphia. Some of it was good-natured, but a lot of it was shameful and mean. In fact, Carl related in the book that the other players were hard on the African-American players, treating them very badly. Carl felt sorry for them.
  5. All-Time Greats — Carl got to meet some of the all-time great ballplayers.  He was coached by Chief Bender, and Al Simmons. He also met Babe Ruth during Connie Mack’s celebration of 50 years in baseball. So, Carl interacted with some of the greatest old-time ballplayers.
  6. Opponents — Carl played against some of the greatest players of all time during baseball’s golden era, and often got the better of them. He faced Ted Williams, Joe Dimaggio, Yogi Berra, Larry Doby, Mickey Mantle, and many more. On the mound, his opponents were Satchel Paige, Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Hal Newhouser, and others.
  7. Did Great Things — Carl threw complete game shutouts, hit a grand slam against the White Sox, hit four other major league homeruns, had many clutch wins and saves, and even clutch hits as a batter.
  8. Good hitter — Carl was a good-hitting pitcher. He could have been an outfielder, and played in the outfield in a couple games. He was also a key pinch hitter. One year he hit .396 — in over 50 at bats — in the major leagues.  This is tough to do! He was a lifetime .250 hitter. One game in particular made me laugh. It was really remarkable. Carl was pitching a complete game. It was tied into the bottom of the 9th. With a couple men on base, guess who came up to bat — Carl. Now, these days, how likely is it that a manager is going to allow the pitcher to bat in the bottom of the 9th of a tie game. This doesn’t happen anymore!  Ever!  So, Carl is allowed to bat, and what does he do? He gets the game-winning walk-off hit!  I looked into this a little bit, and I don’t know of any other instances where a starting pitcher, throwing a complete game, has the walk-off hit to end the game. It certainly hasn’t happened in quite awhile, if at all.  Admittedly, I didn’t look too hard, but it is remarkable nonetheless.  In another game, in the minor leagues, near the end of his career, the manager was thrown out of the game for some reason, and Carl being one of the older players on the team, was asked to manage the rest of the way.  Along comes the bottom of the 9th, and the game is tied. There are a couple of men on. Guess who Carl, the manager, inserts as a pinch-hitter? Himself! And, guess what he did? He got a hit – a walk-off hit to win the game.

So, in summary, Carl was simply a great country ballplayer. On better teams, or with better management, or modern technology, I am sure he would have had an even better, and perhaps longer career. Carl truly was and is the “Wonder Boy” from Gratz!

Thank you ….

“Hass” Hassenger then spoke for a few minutes. He is the only other surviving member from the Gratz HS championship teams. He reminisced about the old days when they were boys playing ball in the valley.

Carl Scheib then answered questions and told jokes and stories for about 45 minutes.

(The entire program was recorded on video by The Gratz Historical Society and is available on DVD from them.)

Copies of the book Wonder Boy, and all other Sunbury Press books can be purchased wherever books are sold. A few signed copies will be offered by The Gratz Historical Society while supplies last. The book can also be purchased directly from Sunbury Press at:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Wonder-Boy-The-Story-of-Carl-Scheib-9781620064139.htm

Carl Scheib to appear in Gratz

Gratz, PA — Former major league pitcher Carl Scheib, who is the youngest player in American League history, having taken the mound for Connie Mack’s Philadelphia A’s in 1943 at the age of 16, will be at the Gratz Community Center July 7th, 2016 at 7 PM. Carl’s biographer, Lawrence Knorr, will present his latest book Wonder Boy – The Story of Carl Scheib: The Youngest Player in American League History. Lawrence and Carl will then answer questions and sign copies of the book which will be for sale through the Gratz Historical Society. Carl will then donate some of his memorabilia to the Gratz Historical Society Museum.

ABOUT THE BOOK

wb_fcCarl Scheib, from Gratz, PA, was a young farm boy of 16 who was signed to a major league contract by Connie Mack of the Philadelphia Athletics. Carl enjoyed 11 years in the major leagues, interrupted by his service in World War II. When he made his first appearance in 1943, he was the youngest player in modern major league history. The following season, Joe Nuxhall of the National League’s Cincinnati Reds, pitched 2/3 of an inning at age 15, breaking Carl’s major league record, but Carl retained his American League record.

Known as a good-hitting pitcher, Carl hit .396 in 1951 and .298 in 1948. He hit five home runs in his career, including a grand slam.

As a pitcher, Carl was a key hurler on the 1948 Philadelphia Athletics, going 14-8 during a tight pennant race. He also went 11-7 in 1952, and saved 11 games in 1951. Behind his “pitch- to-contact” approach, the A’s set the all-time record for double plays in a season with 217 in 1949, a record that still stands.

Wonder Boy chronicles the rapid rise of Carl Scheib from his high school days at Gratz and his contributions to Dalmatia in the West Branch League, to his subsequent major league career, facing such players as Joe DiMaggio, Bill Dickey, Ted Williams, Yogi Berra, Bobby Doerr, Satchel Paige, Bob Lemon, Larry Doby, Bob Feller, Luke Appling, Early Wynn, Mickey Mantle and many more.

This volume is 240 pages

Format – hardcover w/dust jacket

black and white photos. 6 x 9

ISBN:  9781620064139

Price: $24.95

SPO003030 SPORTS & RECREATION / Baseball / History

BIO016000 BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Sports

HIS036080 HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic

A point of light emerges

by Mike Campbell, author of “Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last”

amelia pubThe few Earhart enthusiasts who regularly read my blog (Earhart Truth) are aware that the second of the two major storylines that describe Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last, the near-complete media blackout of the book, has greatly overshadowed its most important aspect – its presentation of the most comprehensive and compelling case ever for the presence and deaths of Amelia and Fred Noonan on Saipan.

I won’t go into details about all the radio hosts, newspaper people and bloggers who’ve pledged to help, only to back off and ignore me after they learn the unpleasant truth about the wretched ends of our two heroes almost 77 years ago. The ugly truth in the Earhart case simply doesn’t fit into the rose-colored worldview of most of our media types. It’s not PC and “it’s not artistic,” as Rosie Perez told Billy Hoyle, Woody Harrelson’s character in White Men Can’t Jump, as they argued about winning versus losing on a bus ride in South Central Los Angeles. And, for most of the rest, it’s just not important anymore, what happened to a pair of Americans who landed in the wrong place the Pacific in 1937 and paid for it with their lives. Now, of course, we have the continuing cover-up and mystification of the truth, which long ago became an accepted piece of our cultural furniture that none but a scant few even questions anymore.  And don’t forget, the wonderful Japanese people have been our best friends in the region since 1945, and we don’t want to re-open old wounds or embarrass our friends, would we?

At the risk of being accused of extreme redundancy and even sour grapes, I must say it again: The establishment’s aversion to the truth in the Earhart case is very real, and it has been  trending even worse than normal until only recently, when a distant point of light emerged from the most unexpected place I could have imagined.

In mid-December, Larry Knorr, Sunbury Press publisher, advised me that he had received a phone call from Kay Alley, vice chair of the Kansas Chapter of the Ninety- Nines, the international organization of licensed women pilots, with members from 35 countries and over 5,500 members worldwide. Ms. Alley asked Larry if she thought I might be interested in speaking at the Ninety-Nines South Central Section Fall Meeting, to be held in Wichita, Kansas, the last weekend of September, 2014. Is the Pope a Catholic? I’ve talked to Kay a few times already, thanked her profusely for this golden opportunity, and we’re on track for the last weekend in September. Kay also says that two other aviation groups that are having conferences at the same time in Wichita have expressed their interest in having me speak to them, so this could be even bigger than we initially envisioned.

Here’s more about the remarkable organization that is the Ninety- Nines, who elected  Amelia Earhart as their first president, taken directly from the Kansas Chapter’s website:

The organization came into being November 2, 1929, at Curtiss Field, Valley Stream, Long Island, New York. All 117 American female pilots had been invited to assemble for mutual support and the advancement of aviation. Louise Thaden was elected secretary and worked tirelessly to keep the group together as we struggled to organize and grow until 1931, when Amelia Earhart was elected as first president and the group was named for the 99 charter members.

Today Ninety-Nines are professional pilots for airlines, industry and government; we are pilots who teach and pilots who fly for pleasure; we are pilots who are technicians and mechanics. But first and foremost, we are women who love to fly!

Our Headquarters, located at the Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is home to our large archival records, video oral histories, personal artifacts, collections and memorabilia, and biographical files on thousands of women pilots from around the world. This is also the site of our 99s Museum of Women Pilots.

To say this elite group of women pilots is pure “establishment” would be an abject understatement.  The Ninety-Nines are universally respected as the ultimate group of professional female aviators – “aviatrixes” in the old parlance. For them to recognize the existence ofTruth at Last at all is more than any establishment organization, outside of a few chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a Kiwanis group and some senior assisted living facilities in Jacksonville have done so far. But the Ninety-Nines carry serious weight, and others who have previously looked askance at this book may reconsider after the September event. This presupposes that my presentation will be good, and so I’ll do all I can to be as ready and professional as I can. I’ve already begun to assemble a comprehensive power point presentation that will tell the Truth at Last story in 90 minutes, and there’s plenty of time to polish it.

Finally we’re going to get a real break, an opportunity to make friends and influence people, all because just one woman likes my book, recognizes the truth and is in a place where she can make a difference. That’s all it takes, so basically it’s in God’s hands. Perhaps the most amazing irony of all –it’s almost impossible for me to label this a coincidence – is that the Kansas Chapter of the Ninety Nines is, of course, the chapter of Amelia’s state of birth.

A few others who want to help this cause are also beginning to emerge. David C. Henley, the publisher emeritus of the Lahontan Valley(Nevada) News, has promised to do a story for the Carson City newspaper, the Nevada Appeal, after he takes some photos of the old Garapan jail on Saipan during a forthcoming visit to the scene of the crime, and I’ll be on Truth Frequency Radio this Sunday, March 9 at 5 p.m., EDT.  A few other things are in the works, but it’s too early to announce anything.

So please stay tuned. As I’ve told Larry Knorr several times, “This book has not yet begun to fight!” Nor have I.

Bill Martin, C James Gilbert and Robert Miller headline at Sunbury Press book release party

Mechanicsburg, PA – Sunbury Press is hosting a book release party at its headquarters at 50 West Main Street in Mechanicsburg on Friday February 1, 2013 from 6 pm to 9 pm. Authors William Martin(Quoting Liberally), C James Gilbert (A Deeper Sense of Loyalty) and Robert Miller (The Cogan Legend) will be presenting and signing their books.

VIP Guests (from 6 to 9 PM):
Robert E. Miller, the author of the early Pennsylvania murder mystery “The Cogan Legend” will talk about his debut novel.

About The Cogan Legend:
The Cogan, a mysterious stretch of Pennsylvania with towering hills, swooping trees and narrow roads, claims the life of a lovely young woman, best friend to Ann Fairchild, a passionate, headstrong girl of 18. Barely escaping with her life, Ann succumbs to shock and is unable to recall exactly what happened that cold, wintry day in the Cogan. Meanwhile, Ann’s new suitor, Army Lieutenant Phillip Matter, hunts for the killer. Driven by guilt and shame for not saving the girls from harm that day, he grows increasingly more frustrated as he scours the Cogan for a killer he knows is still there.

Ann’s own guilt gnaws at her. It’s because of her that Rachel is dead. She’s the one to blame! She’s the one whose escapes tarnished the Fairchild name, and she’s the one who disobeyed her father and lied. She had to be punished. It was she who then convinced Rachel to accompany them to this rural setting. And it was she who wheedled and cajoled and begged her father to take the trip that led through the Cogan.

The Lieutenant thought it would be easy to find the killer, he was mistaken. With a stroke of luck on that last day of the search the soldiers capture the killer dragging him from his hiding place. The killer extracts a promise from the Lieutenant. He is taken to Sunbury where a judge, without evidence to the contrary, sentences him to hang by his neck until dead.

Ann’s memory rejects that gruesome day, until she remembers that he is innocent. A desperate effort to reach Sunbury to save Poll Soll proves futile by seconds and instead she witnesses his hanging.

After a time for healing Ann and Phillip marry but the promise that Lieutenant Matter wishes he’d never made turns his happy life miserable and threatens to take away everything he loves and lives for if he doesn’t fulfill it.

C James Gilbert, author of his debut Civil War era novel will present “A Deeper Sense of Loyalty.”

About A Deeper Sense of Loyalty:
In 1860, James Langdon, a southern boy from Macon, Georgia, is all set to celebrate his eighteenth birthday after graduating from school in New York. He has been groomed to handle the business end of his father’s large cotton plantation. A deeply religious lad with an uncharacteristic aversion to slavery, James’s father raised him to believe that unlike other negroes, the workers on Langdon Plantation were sharecroppers and not slaves.

When James finds out that his father has deceived him, it sets up a conflict between the two men that takes a war to settle. When hostilities break out in 1861, he leaves home, ostensibly to serve the Southern cause. Instead, he embarks on his own mission to help slaves escape to Canada.

Now considered to be a traitor and an outlaw by the South, danger is his constant companion; certain death awaits him should he be caught. Although he is powerless to go against his conscience, he is equally ridden with guilt for turning his back on his heritage. James knows that when the war ends, there will still be one last confrontation left for him: facing his father.

Author William Martin

Author William Martin

Professor William Martin has been dubbed “the Ultimate Quotographer of the American Left.” will be discussing recent political events and presenting his most recent books “Quoting Liberally” and “Quotes from the Underground”.

About Quotes from the Underground:
“Quotes from the Underground – Radical Wisdom in Small Doses” is a remarkable resource and must-read for writers, researchers, activists and indeed anyone who embraces progressive values and hopes to rescue politics from corporate control.” — Joel Bakan, author of The Corporation and Childhood Under Siege

“William Martin does it again with this splendid new volume of insights, wisdom, bon mots, and just plain common sense from those who are working to improve our collective lot.” – David Morris, co-founder of the Institute for Local Self Reliance

I highly recommend this uplifting compendium of wisdom for achieving social justice, protecting the environment, and renewing our democracy. Worth taking in large doses. — Jill Stein, Green Party USA candidate for President

“Quotes from the Underground is . . . a stock of patriotic wisdom that should be nailed to the door of the New York Stock Exchange!” — Charlie Cray, research specialist with Greenpeace USA and the director of the Center for Corporate Policy

“There’s something to irritate just about everyone in this delightful collection of verbal prickly burrs.” — Alfie Kohn, author of FEEL-BAD EDUCATION: . . . And Other Contrarian Essays on Children and Schooling

I’m a quote collector. They inspire and instruct me. Thank you, William Martin, for compiling this book of quotes. I plan to use them liberally.
— Gloria Feldt, former president of Planned Parenthood, speaker, and author of No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think About Power

“An excellent read–or rather lots of them–for atheists and others who care about liberty and our fellow human beings. Words from hundreds of wise people like Richard Dawkins, Ellen DeGeneres, Steve Allen, and George Orwell, to make you laugh, think–or both.” — Ed Buckner, former president of American Atheists

“William Martin’s excellent chronicle of quotations from the American Left needs to be lifted above ground and spread across the land. Read, absorb, and take action!” — Jim Hightower, nationally syndicated columnist, radio commentator, author, and editor of the Hightower Lowdown

About Quoting Liberally:
Dr. William Martin has been a college professor at Temple University and Monmouth University and has worked for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as a press secretary, school auditor, and management consultant. He has published the other books of quotations, The Best Liberal Quotes Ever, What Liberals Believe, and Quotes from the Underground: Radical Wisdom in Small Doses. A national columnist calls Martin “the ultimate quotographer of the American Left.” He lives in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, and sells books at Zabby Books @ Amazon.com.

Some samples from the book:
In the Soviet Union, capitalism triumphed over communism. In this country, capitalism triumphed over democracy. – Fran Lebowitz
A Romney presidency will be awesome unless you’re poor, sick, gay, female, Mexican or a dog. – Andy Borowitz
If homosexuality is a disease, let’s all call in queer to work: “Hello. Can’t work today, still queer.” – Robin Tyler
I hate the word homophobia. It’s not a phobia. You are not scared. You are an asshole. – Unknown
The idea that the blame for our government’s dysfunction is equally shared by the parties just is a giant, steaming mound of horse shit. – Bill Maher
Science flies you to the moon. Religion flies you into buildings. – Richard Dawkins

All authors will be signing copies of their books after their presentations.

Snacks and drinks will be provided.

The event will be held at:
50 West Main St
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055

The location is directly across the street from the Brath & Hughes Art Gallery. about a half block west of the Gingerbread Man. There is plenty of free public parking in the rear.

All of Sunbury’s titles will be on display and available for sale.

Author presentations will at 7:15

Author William Martin

Robert Picardo tapped to be Dr. Conroy in “The Cursed Man” movie

Robert PicardoActor Robert Picardo, best known for his roles in “Stargate” (Agent Richard Woolsey) and in numerous “Star Trek” movies and episodes, has been selected by producer/director James Perry to play Dr. Conroy in the movie adaptation of Keith Rommel’s novel “The Cursed Man,” published by Sunbury Press in 2011.

About Robert Picardo (from IMDb):
Robert Picardo was born on October 27, 1953 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, where he spent his whole childhood. He graduated from the William Penn Charter School and attended Yale University. At Yale, he landed a role in Leonard Bernstein’s “Mass” and at the age of 19, he played a leading role in the European premiere of “Mass”. Later, he graduated with a B.A. in Drama from Yale University. He appeared in the David Mamet play “Sexual Perversity in Chicago and with Diane Keaton in “The Primary English Class”. In 1977, he made his Broadway debut in the comedy hit “Gemini” with Danny Aiello and also appeared in Bernard Slade’s “Tribute”, “Beyond Therapy” as well as “Geniuses” and “The Normal Heart” for which he won a Drama-Logue Award.

Then, he became involved in television, where he soon was nominated for an Emmy Award for his role as Mr. Cutlip on the series “The Wonder Years” (1988). Robert appeared in several series: “Frasier” (1993), “Ally McBeal” (1997), “Home Improvement” (1991), “The Outer Limits” (1995) and “Sabrina, the Teenage Witch” (1996). In 1995, he got the role as The Doctor on “Star Trek: Voyager” (1995) where he also directed two episodes. He also got roles in Doubletalk (1975), Star 80 (1983), Get Crazy (1983), Oh, God! You Devil (1984), Innerspace (1987), Munchies (1987), “China Beach” (1988), Samantha (1992), White Mile (1994) (TV), Star Trek: First Contact (1996), Small Soldiers (1998), Quantum Quest: A Cassini Space Odyssey (2010) (aka 2004: A Light Knight’s Odyssey), and so on.

He resides in Los Angeles, California with his wife Linda, and their two daughters.

Recent Roles:

2014 Star Trek: Renegades (TV movie) (pre-production)
Dr. Lewis Zimmerman

2013 The Cursed Man (filming)
Director Conroy

2013 Infiltrators (post-production)
Reverend Quaid

???? Last Stop (post-production)
Man in Black

2013 The Client List (TV series)
Judge Hughes
– Episode #2.4 (2013) … Judge Hughes

2012 Call of Duty: Black Ops II (Video Game)
Erik Brieghner (voice)

2012 Atlas Shrugged II: The Strike
Dr. Robert Stadler

2012 Mansion of Blood
Samuel Corbett

2012 Austin & Ally (TV series)
Dr. Grant
– Successes & Setbacks (2012) … Dr. Grant

2012 Femme Fatales (TV series)
Hieronymus Hawks
– Bad Science (2012) … Hieronymus Hawks

2012 The Legends of Nethiah
Grandpa / Sir Hanif

2012 Camilla Dickinson
Mr. Stephanowski

2012 The Mentalist (TV series)
Jason Cooper
– His Thoughts Were Red Thoughts (2012) … Jason Cooper

2012 Body of Proof (TV series)
Henry Pedroni
– Cold Blooded (2012) … Henry Pedroni

2012 Harry’s Law (TV series)
Annie’s Psychiatrist
– Gorilla My Dreams (2012) … Annie’s Psychiatrist

2012 Rock Jocks
Guard 1

2011 NTSF:SD:SUV (TV series)
Damian
– Twistin’ the Night Away (2011) … Damian

2011 Morlocks (TV movie)
Colonel Wichita

2011 United States of Tara (TV series)
Dr. Smolow
– Bryce Will Play (2011) … Dr. Smolow

2011 SGU Stargate Universe (TV series)
Richard Woolsey
– Seizure (2011) … Richard Woolsey

2011 Trail of Blood
Agent Weston

2011/I End of the Road
Bob

2010 Supernatural (TV series)
Leprechaun / Wayne Whittaker Jr.
– Clap Your Hands If You Believe (2010) … Wayne Whittaker Jr./Leprechaun

2010 Call of Duty: Black Ops (Video Game)
Robert McNamara (voice)

2010 Monsterwolf (TV movie)
Stark

2006-2009 Stargate: Atlantis (TV series)
Richard Woolsey
– Enemy at the Gate (2009) … Richard Woolsey
– Vegas (2008) … Richard Woolsey
– Identity (2008) … Richard Woolsey
– Infection (2008) … Richard Woolsey
– Brain Storm (2008) … Richard Woolsey (credit only)
See all 26 episodes »

2009 The Awakened
Maddox

2009 Sensored
Wade

2008 Smallville (TV series)
Edward Teague
– Arctic (2008) … Edward Teague
– Quest (2008) … Edward Teague

2008 Universal Signs
Father Joe

2007 CSI: NY (TV series)
Sheriff Benson
– Boo (2007) … Sheriff Benson

2007 The Closer (TV series)
Mr. Sheffield
– Saving Face (2007) … Mr. Sheffield

2007 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (Video Game)
Singapore Townsfolk (voice)

2004-2007 Stargate SG-1 (TV series)
Richard Woolsey
– The Shroud (2007) … Richard Woolsey
– Morpheus (2006) … Richard Woolsey
– Flesh and Blood (2006) … Richard Woolsey
– The Scourge (2006) … Richard Woolsey
– Prototype (2005) … Richard Woolsey
See all 7 episodes »

2007 Cold Case (TV series)
Arthur Lennox
– Knuckle Up (2007) … Arthur Lennox

2005-2006 E-Ring (TV series)
Larry Kincaid
– Fallen Angels (2006) … Larry Kincaid
– The Forgotten (2005) … Larry Kincaid
– Toy Soldiers (2005) … Larry Kincaid
– Weekend Pass (2005) … Larry Kincaid

2004 The West Wing (TV series)
E. Bradford Shelton
– The Supremes (2004) … E. Bradford Shelton

2004 Star Trek: The Experience – Borg Invasion 4D
The Doctor

2003 Stephen King’s Dead Zone (TV series)
Mitch McMurtry
– The Storm (2003) … Mitch McMurtry

2003 Sabrina, the Teenage Witch (TV series)
Bob Jacobs
– Soul Mates (2003) … Bob Jacobs
– Spellmanian Slip (2003) … Bob Jacobs

2002 The Practice (TV series)
Dr. Edmunds
– Neighboring Species (2002) … Dr. Edmunds

2001 Frasier (TV series)
Charlie Koechner
– Bully for Martin (2001) … Charlie Koechner

1995-2001 Star Trek: Voyager (TV series)
The Doctor / Dr. Lewis Zimmerman / Equinox EMH / …
– Endgame (2001) … The Doctor
– Renaissance Man (2001) … The Doctor
– Homestead (2001) … The Doctor
– Natural Law (2001) … The Doctor
– Friendship One (2001) … The Doctor
See all 170 episodes »

2000 Star Trek Voyager: Elite Force (Video Game)
The Doctor (voice)

1999 Ally McBeal (TV series)
Barry Philbrick
– Love’s Illusions (1999) … Barry Philbrick

1997 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (TV series)
Dr. Lewis Zimmerman / EMH Mark I
– Doctor Bashir, I Presume? (1997) … Dr. Lewis Zimmerman / EMH Mark I

1996 Star Trek: First Contact
Holographic Doctor

About “The Cursed Man”:
The Cursed Man by Keith Rommel tells the story of Alister Kunkle, a patient at Sunnyside Capable Care Mental Institution. Alister has been in seclusion for the last 25 years having no contact with the staff or the outside world. The reason for this is that anyone who communicates with Alister dies within the day, for he is the Cursed Man and Death takes a professional interest in those unlucky enough to cross his path. Believing him simply deranged, Dr Anna Lee, an up and coming young psychiatrist, has come to cure Alister. She is warned about Alister’s past and is shown evidence of previous encounters made by the skeptical or unbelieving, all of whom died, sometimes horribly. Regardless of the stories Anna will not be dissuaded and is reluctantly allowed access to Alister. All assume her fate is sealed but when she returns unharmed the next day we also start to wonder about the stories. So begins an enthralling narrative told in the past and the present as Anna attempts to learn why Alister believes he is cursed, while at the same time trying to convince him the events were not real and that in fact he is merely ill and so can be cured. Is Alister truly followed by death or is he simply mentally ill? The Cursed Man is an extremely well-written suspense horror story… I enjoyed it immensely; right up until the very end I was never sure of the outcome… Great story telling in the tradition of Stephen King… — Booklore

The Joes on “Chuck Rhodes Out and About” on ABC 27

Click this link to view the video Joe Farrell and Joe Farley, authors of the Keystone Tombstones series.

http://www.abc27.com/story/20115276/two-joes-spotlight-the-famous-buried-in-pa

About Keystone Tombstones Volume 2:

Joe Farrell and Joe Farley explore the cemeteries (and pubs) of Pennsylvania in search of interesting graves and stories about the interred.

“Where else can you find Phil “Chicken Man” Testa and Mr. Rogers in the same neighborhood…” The Publisher

Included in the volume:

  • Richie Ashburn “His Whiteness”
  • Dick Winters & Joe Toye “Band of Brothers”
  • Bonneville “Bert” Bell “Modern Football’s Founding Father”
  • Smedly Butler “The Fighting Quaker”
  • Michael Cheslock “The Lattimer Massacre”
  • Billy Conn “The Pittsburgh Kid”
  • Jim Croce “You Don’t Mess Around With Jim”
  • Stephen Foster “The Music Man”
  • Robert Morris & James Wilson “Founding Fathers”
  • Josh Gibson “The Black Babe Ruth”
  • Eddie Plank & Christy Mathewson “Hall of Fame Hurlers”
  • Winfield Scott Hancock “Hancock the Superb”
  • Milton S. Hershey “The Chocolate King”
  • Herman Webster Mudgett aka Dr. Henry H. Holmes “America’s Answer to the Ripper”
  • Johnstown Flood Victims “An Act of God?”
  • Philip Livingston “A Little Known Founding Father”
  • Saints Katharine Drexel & John Neumann “Philadelphia Saints”
  • Michael Maggio, Antonio Pollinam, Angelo Bruno, Philip Testa & Salvatore Testa “Philadelphia’s Sinners”
  • Fred Rogers “America’s Favorite Neighbor”
  • Bessie Smith “The Empress of the Blues”
  • Thaddeus Stevens “The Dictator of Congress”
  • General John Sutter “After the Gold Rush”
  • Charles William Tate “Tuskegee Airman”
  • George Taylor “An Indentured Servant Who Became a Founding Father”
  • Harry Kendall Thaw “Murder at Madison Square Garden”
  • John Wanamaker “A Business Pioneer”
  • Medal of Honor Recipients
  • Unusual Tombstones

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Tombstones-Volume-Two-9781620061190.htm