Monthly Archives: July 2016

Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal headline “Keystone Corruption Continues”

kcc_fcHARRISBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Keystone Corruption Continues: Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal, Brad Bumsted’s latest compilation of Pennsylvania state government malfeasance.

About the Book:
Once again, a crime wave swept through Pennsylvania state government. During a 17-month period from early 2015 through mid-2016,  a sitting state treasurer, and a former state treasurer, both statewide elected officials who were guardians of taxpayers’ money, were charged with crimes, as was an ex-Governor’s chief of staff and the attorney general, the state’s chief law enforcement officer. It was preceded by a sting investigation that resulted in state legislators videotaped taking cash from an undercover operative posing as a lobbyist and an alleged pay to play scheme at the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission. Porn and off-color emails  on government computers took out two Supreme Court justices. It’s all in Brad Bumsted’s latest book: Keystone Corruption Continues: Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal.

Contents:
Foreword by John Baer
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Sting
1. Lost Opportunity
2. Turnpike Scandal
3. “I’m Your Guy”
4. Business As Usual
5. “Make Work” and Big Bucks
6. “I Am the Fucking Senator”
7. An Ivy League Shakedown
8. “Not Prosecutable”
9. The Sprague Threat
10. “I Am An Attorney”
11. The Sandusky Report
12. Seth
13. The Lex Street Massacre
14. The Very Questionable Accident
15. “Happy Birthday Ron Waters”
16. Bizarre 24 Hours
17. Difficult to Manage
18. “Political Peep Show”
19. “Unholy Mess”
20. Risa
21. The Cartels
22. The Supremes
23. Porn Warfare
24. Citizen Kane?
25. LCB’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Culture
26. The Final Sting
27. In the Final Analysis
Epilogue by R.B. Swift
Reflections by Franklin Kury

bradbumstedAbout the Author:
Brad Bumsted is a prominent journalist in Pennsylvania, working for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. He is noted for writing “reform minded stories” about the Pennsylvania General Assembly.

In 2005, he was named one of “Pennsylvania’s Most Influential Reporters” by the Pennsylvania political news website PoliticsPA. In 2008, the political website PolitickerPA.com named him one of the “Most Powerful Political Reporters” in Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Report named him to the 2009 “The Pennsylvania Report 100” list of influential figures in Pennsylvania politics and described him as a “mainstay in the halls of the capitol.”

Keystone Corruption Continues: Cash Payoffs, Porngate and the Kathleen Kane Scandal
Authored by Brad Bumsted
List Price: $17.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
278 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066935
ISBN-10: 1620066939
BISAC: Political Science / Government / State & Provincial

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Corruption-Cont…

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Fifty years of research to make “Cast Iron Signs of Pennsylvania Towns and Other Landmarks.”

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released Cast Iron Signs of Pennsylvania Towns and Other Landmarks, N. Clair Clawser’s compilation of early roadside markers in the Keystone state.

About the Book:
cis_fcAuthor and field researcher N. Clair Clawser has spent over 50 years traveling the highways and thoroughfares of Pennsylvania to capture images of the cast iron road signs placed there in the early days of automobiles. Many of these signs are long gone, but quite a few remain and have been restored.

Pennsylvania is unique with this type of town sign, which could become a thing of the past. (New York State has many cast iron signs, too, but they are on many subjects and not necessarily on town names.) Almost from the start Clair noticed some of these signs were being removed, even as he discovered that many still remained. Originally cast from about 1929 until 1942, these signs were made largely in either the Carlisle Foundry in Carlisle or Geiser Manufacturing Company in Waynesboro. Both companies are long out of business. There are a small number that were produced elsewhere, but not many. (Allegheny Foundry.) Jack Graham of the Keystone Markers Trust stated that the Department of Highways report for 1928-1930 said, “During the biennium 1,359 information signs were placed including historical, stream, state institution, speed limit and parking restriction signs.”

Many of these signs endure to this day, but are in constant danger of removal. A few new ones have been posted, but many more should be. The aforementioned report does not say how many were town signs. If the total was all towns and divided by 4 that would only be 339 towns. There are numerous stream signs still in existence today. These are 2-sided with just the name. Town signs are one-sided. We can only imagine that each town that had a cast iron sign may have had 4, one for each direction. Very few towns, that still have a sign, have more than two today. Hanover, a rarity, has six. Gettysburg has 4, as does Jonestown. York New Salem has 3, as does Lemoyne. Rothsville had 4, but one was removed. Schoeneck has 4 new ones installed by the Keystone Markers Trust, and Mountville has 3.

Signs from 67 Pennsylvania counties are listed, including the known contents each sign. Pictures are shown where available.

Cast Iron Signs of Pennsylvania Towns and Other Landmarks
Authored by N. Clair Clawser
List Price: $24.95
Hardcover: 146 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (July 10, 2016)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620067374
ISBN-13: 978-1620067376
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic
TRANSPORTATION / Automotive / History
TRAVEL / Special Interest / General

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Cast-Iron-Signs-of-Penns…

Is the future duke hiding as an opera singer? 12-year-old Franni knows and won’t tell.

MANTUA, ItalyJuly 18, 2016PRLog — Sunbury Press has released Franni and the Duke, Anne E. Johnson’s middle-grade novel about two sisters trying out for Monteverdi’s opera in 1608, only to stumble upon a handsome and mysterious singer.

FATD_fcAbout the Book:
In May of 1608, the Duke of Mantua will throw the most spectacular wedding extravaganza in history. But it will all be ruined unless twelve-year-old Franni can keep a very big secret.

Franni and the Duke, a middle-grade novel, sets a fictional mystery against a specific historical backdrop. It takes place during rehearsals for Arianna, an opera by the great composer Claudio Monteverdi. When Franni and her older sister Alli run away to Mantua, they both find work in Monteverdi’s company. A messenger from the north announces that the next duke of the town of Bergamo is missing, and he may well be in Mantua. Alli notices that Luca, a singer she’s in love with, fits the missing Duke’s description. Although Franni thinks Luca is a pompous idiot, she promises for Alli’s sake to keep Luca’s secret safe and protect him from bounty hunters and Bergamo’s rival family. She does this with the help of the company’s set designer, a worldly wise and world-weary dwarf named Edgardo, who is not exactly what he seems.

Claudio Monteverdi

Claudio Monteverdi

Excerpt:
Thursday, May 8, 1608
“I’m hungry,” said Franni. She ached all over from hours of walking down rocky roads in the Northern Italian countryside. “Please, can we get some food, Alli?” She shivered in the chilly spring drizzle.

Franni’s older sister, Alessandra, walked in front as usual. She looked back and smiled weakly. “I know you’re hungry, Franni. I am, too.” Alli’s eyes were glassy in her drawn face. “We’re almost to Mantua. That’s a big city with lots of rich people. I’m sure someone will take pity on us there.”

Although Franni doubted it, she nodded. A day and a half ago, they’d run away from their stepfather in Verona. They’d left in the middle of the night, carrying only a satchel of clothes each, and one loaf of bread between them. The last town they’d been through hadn’t shown them much pity. When they’d taken a drink at the central fountain, a soldier had chased them right out of town.

“I’m so tired.” She hardly had the strength to get any sound out. There was no way Franni could take another step, so she sat down right there in the road.

Alli grabbed Franni’s elbow and yanked. “Come on. We’ve got to get to Mantua before the sun goes down.” A slender, delicate creature of seventeen, Alli was no match for Franni when the younger girl felt stubborn. Franni willed herself to weigh as much as the elephant her real father once saw in Algiers. He’d said it was the size of twenty men. Closing her eyes, Franni glued herself to the paving stones, thinking heavy thoughts.

“A cart!” Alli let go of Franni’s arm and stood up, waving.

Franni’s heavy mood turned to dandelion seeds and floated away. “A cart?” She craned to see the black horse drawing a workman’s cart slowly along the road toward them. “Do you think he’ll give us a ride?”

“He has to,” said Alli. It sounded like a prayer. “He just has to.”

We’re saved! thought Franni. But when the cart pulled near enough that they could smell the tang of horse sweat, she changed her mind. “He’s an undertaker,” she whispered. “Look at the white marble slabs he’s dragging in that cart. It would be bad luck to ride with him.” She backed off the road and pulled her embroidered scarf over her head and face.

To Franni’s distress, Alli stepped into the middle of the road and waved her arms wider. If only their mother could see them now, two noble girls, behaving like beggars. Surely Mama could see them as she looked down from Heaven. She probably also saw how their stepfather treated the girls after their mother died. Franni was sure Mama up in Heaven approved of how she and Alli had sneaked out of the gates of Verona one night to find a happier life.

“Whoa!” said the cart driver, pulling back on the horse’s reins. “What is it, child? Why are you in the road? Do you need help?”

About the Author:
Anne E. Johnson taught music history for many years in New York City, specializing in the Baroque and Renaissance periods, and she feels a particular connection to the music and times of Claudio Monteverdi. Besides fiction, she has also written performing arts journalism for publications includingThe New York Times and Stagebill Magazine. Dozens of her short stories, for both kids and adults, have appeared in print and online.

Anne lives in Brooklyn with her husband, playwright Ken Munch. When she’s not writing or editing, she’s probably baking or going to concerts and plays. Her website is http://AnneEJohnson.com.

Franni and the Duke
Authored by Anne E. Johnson
List Price: $9.99
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
156 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067031
ISBN-10: 162006703X
BISAC: Juvenile Fiction / Performing Arts / Theater

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Franni-and-the-Duke-9781…

Paul Sorvino: “‘The Making of a Don’ is atavistic, primitive, and oh so hard to put down.”

NEW YORK — Sunbury Press has released The Making of a Don, Charles Ursitti’s fictionalized account of the rise of a Mafia boss in New York’s Little Italy decades ago.

Paul Sorvino

Paul Sorvino

What Others Are Saying:
This book is most rare in its chronicling of a mafia family. Ursitti tells the story without sentimentality or literary agenda. As easily as ordering a plate of pasta with sausages. His style seeks no approval for itself but in short order the minimalism, nay innocence, compels and invades so that you feel you are in the very rooms where the hits are agreed to and business is set aright and lurking death is assuaged once more. Atavistic, primitive and oh so hard to put down! — PAUL SORVINO (actor: Good Fellas, Nixon, Law & Order, Murder She Wrote, Moonlighting …)

About the Book:
Frankie Boy reminisces about his childhood living in a big, Italian, Mafia family in New York City and how excited everyone would get each time Uncle Frank, also his mentor and idol, came by his grandma’s house for a delicious, Italian meal. Uncle Frank is Frankie Boy’s entire world growing up, and he continues to be so throughout his life. However, Frankie Boy wants to pave his own path in life, a life of legitimacy, and a life where his hard-earned degree is being put to good use. With the help and support of Uncle Frank, he is able to do so. However, life doesn’t always unravel exactly as we’d like it to, especially when your uncle is Capo dei Capi, Boss of Bosses, and Frankie Boy finds himself once again searching for his place and purpose in life. Uncle Frank once again offers him the opportunity to learn tmoad_fcthe family business, and after much deliberating, Frankie Boy begins learning the ins and outs of mob life with his best friend Nicky at his side, a loyal and loving friend that goes to extreme lengths to ensure the success of Frankie.

The Making of a Don is a raw and very real portrayal of the inner workings and hierarchy of the Italian Mafia. Frankie Boy works his way up from the very bottom with the experienced guidance of his uncle, and he learns that even those that are closest, those that are “family,” can still betray you in the worst ways possible. Frankie must decide who he can really trust, who has his back, and what lengths to take to protect his business, his family, and his friendships. Nothing is at it seems when you’re in the mob, and Frankie must find ways to ensure all five families are happy and under his thumb.

About the Author:
Charles J. Ursitti grew up in New York City and has spent most of his life there.

After working in the corporate world for ten years, Charles turned his talents into producing and promoting billiards. His events were aired on ABC’s Wide World of Sports with Howard Cosell for five years, CBS Sports Spectacular with John Madden for seven years, NBC’s Sport World, ESPN, USA Cable and numerous other local cable stations. He managed and promoted the legends of the game including Willie Mosconi, Minnesota Fats, and Steve Mizerak, just to name a few. He also created

Charles Ursitti (right) shaking Willie Mosconi's hand while Howard Cosell looks on.

Charles Ursitti (right) shaking Willie Mosconi’s hand while Howard Cosell looks on.

the most accurate and complete history of both pocket billiards and three cushion billiards from their inception in 1878 to present times. He is known as one of the most knowledgeable billiard historians in the world. His efforts were rewarded when on October 29, 2015 Charlie became the 66th inductee in the prestigious Billiard Congress of America’s Hall of Fame.

Charlie was also a firearms designer and a professional skeet, trap and handgun shooter. After a severe car accident in April of 2000, he retired from shooting and turned his skills to writing. He wrote for several billiard magazines and then turned to writing novels.

The Making Of A Don is his first published novel.

The Making of a Don
Authored by Charles J. Ursitti
List Price: $9.99
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
144 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066775
ISBN-10: 1620066777
BISAC: Fiction / Thrillers / Crime

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Making-of-a-Don-9781…

Lawrence Knorr’s remarks about “Wonder Boy” Carl Scheib at the Gratz Historical Society

Gratz, PA (July 7, 2016) — Former major league baseball player Carl Scheib, the subject of the recent biography Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History, traveled to his hometown of Gratz, Pennsylvania from his residence in San Antonio, Texas for a presentation and book signing on Thursday July 7th, 2016, held at the Gratz Community Center. The event was organized by the Gratz Historical Society. ABC27 from Harrisburg and The Citizen Standard covered the event, which was well-attended–over 120 people were present.

(Click here for the ABC27 story by Ross Lippman)

wb_fcFollowing is a transcript of the remarks made by Lawrence Knorr, the author or Wonder Boy:

Welcome everyone!  What a turnout!  Thank you so much for coming out this evening to support Carl Scheib. Carl, Sunbury Press, and the Gratz Historical Society all thank you for doing so.

My name is Lawrence Knorr. I am the author of Wonder Boy: The Story of Carl Scheib — The Youngest Player in American League History.  My ancestors are from the nearby Mahantongo Valley, near the village of Rough and Ready and Salem Church, just a few miles from here. I’ll never forget the first time I saw the valley, crossing over Mahantongo Moutain. At the peak, I looked out and saw the beautiful Mahantongo Valley before me with the Salem Church nestled below. It was a sight to see. I have collaborated in several books about the area, and as the owner of Sunbury Press, have published a number of books about the region, including those by Steve Troutman, whom many of you know.

So, many people have asked me … why write a book about Carl Scheib?  Some have even asked me if I did it because I was related to him.  The truth starts with a funny story.  A few years ago, while working with Joe Farrell and Joe Farley of the Keystone Tombstones series, which we publish, I was looking for interesting stories for their Sports volume.  I stumbled across Carl’s story online — the youngest player in modern history when he came up — and saw he was from Gratz, Pennsylvania. Given his age, I figured he was probably dead and buried in Pennsylvania. The Joes write about famous or noteworthy people buried in Pennsylvania.  So, I called the Joes and told them about Carl, and they were intrigued.  A few days later, I had dug further into Carl’s situation and found him alive and well in San Antonio, Texas. I called the Joes back and let them know Carl was off the list — he was still alive!  They expressed a little disappointment, and then I declared I would write his biography anyway.

I reached out to Carl with a letter and soon we were talking on the phone and via the mail. We agreed it would be best to meet in person at his home. My wife, Tammi, and I flew to San Antonio and spent three days with Carl reviewing his memorabilia and photographs and interviewing him about his life and his days in baseball.  We also attended a couple Texas League games at the Missions ballpark.  It was a lot of fun to watch a few games with Carl and talk about baseball.

The book took two years to write — part time — and was released by Sunbury Press last month. It relates the interesting story of Carl’s rise from high school ball to the major leagues at the age of 16, and recounts every major league appearance he made.

The story of Carl’s discovery, due to the actions of a local grocery clerk, Hannah Clark, and a traveling salesman, Al Grossman is somewhat apocryphal.  The story was repeated again in a recent news article in the Harrisburg paper.  What is not told is that Hannah was much more than a grocery clerk.  She was Carl’s cousin!  What also was not told accurately by Clifford Kachline back in 1948 in The Sporting News was story of Carl’s tryout. In those days, they embellished news stories to put a family-oriented spin on them. In the story, it was assumed Carl’s father drove him to the tryout in 1942, when Carl was 15. What he didn’t say was that Gummy Rothermal, an older pitcher on the Dalmatia team in the West Branch League drove Carl because he had a good car.  Can you imagine two young lads, in 1942, driving on the two lane roads from the valley to Philadelphia — over 100 miles — to try out for a major league team?  I can only imagine the conversation they had. I am sure Gummy hoped he’d get a tryout too, but that didn’t happen.

Carl had been a high school star in 9th, 10th, and 11th grades. Gratz won the baseball championship in 1941, and in 1942 with Carl as their ace pitcher. Carl was also invited to pitch for Dalmatia in the West Branch League … a town league of adult men who admitted teenage players during the war years.

Carl went to his tryout at Shibe Park in Philadelphia. It was raining that morning, and the game had been canceled. At first Carl thought the tryout was canceled too! But, after he found his way into the Athletics’ ballpark, he received his tryout in front of Connie Mack and others in the A’s brass. Connie told him to hurry back next year, after school was out.

LK headshot

Author Lawrence Knorr

Carl went home and did just that. The following spring, in 1943, after school was out, he quit high school and headed to Philadelphia. He initially was a batting practice pitcher, and then began taking trips on the train with the team. By September, he was ready to go, and signed a contract. At this point, his father came from Gratz to co-sign, since he was underage. Carl then entered his first game that day — against the New York Yankees!

When he walked onto the field, Carl was the youngest player in modern major league history.  There had been some younger players back in the 1800s, but no one as young as Carl, at 16 years, had played major league baseball since. He was used sparingly in relief the rest of the way and had respectable numbers. The next year, a 15 year old named Joe Nuxhall threw less than an inning of crappy ball giving up five runs on five walks and two hits. Nuxhall then went to the minors and did not return for seven years!  Carl stuck in the big leagues and got better and better. Personally, I think there should be an asterisk next to Nuxhall’s appearance, but it is, what it is. Carl is still the youngest player to have ever appeared in the American League.

Carl was with the A’s the whole season in 1944, and then when he turned 18, in 1945, he was drafted into the Army early that season. Fortunately, the war was ending when Carl went off to Germany as one of the occupation troops. He was stationed at Nuremburg during the trials. He participated on two different teams in the Army, and won nearly all of his games, including the GI championship in Germany.

Upon his return in 1947, Carl was back with the A’s and continued what many would say was just an “average” major league career. But I disagree. Carl played 11 seasons at the highest level of his sport. Not many players do that. He had not played in the minor leagues before coming to the majors, and had performed very well at a very young age. Anyone who makes a major league is one of the top players in the sport, and Carl played at that level for over a decade. So no, Carl was not a hall-of-famer, or a World Series winner, or an All-Star, but he was a solid performer for many years, who did some remarkable things, some of which I will talk about in a few minutes.

So, why is Carl Scheib’s career important? I’ll give you eight reasons:

  1. Connie Mack — Connie Mack was involved with the Philadelphia A’s from their beginning, and spent over 50 years in baseball from the late 1800s into the 1950s. His teams in the early 20th century were the “Yankees” before the Yankees became good. Carl was signed and managed by Connie Mack, one of the all-time greats. So, Carl’s career, thanks to Mack, bridges all the way back to the early days of major league baseball, and carries into the golden era.
  2. World War II — Many players got their opportunities to play thanks to a lot of the players entering the service. Carl was someone who benefited from this situation. This is an interesting era in baseball history, which has been studied quite a bit. Quite a few of these players were older and were called up from the minors to play. Many of their careers ended when the boys came home. Carl was not one of them. He stuck — and got better when the best players were back.
  3. A’s last pennant race — The A’s were in Philadelphia until the late 1950s, when they moved to Kansas City and then onto Oakland. We now know them as the Oakland A’s and many can remember the great teams of the 1970s. But the Kansas City A’s never were in the pennant race, so it was the 1948 A’s of Philadelphia, who last challenged for the lead. This team was in first place as late as August, with Carl as one of their star pitchers having his best season. Even after the A’s faded, Carl continued to pitch well as the Indians, Red Sox, and Yankees battled for the championship. The last week of the season, Carl beat the Yankees, denying them the pennant, allowing the Indians to win. Under pressure, Carl was brilliant, and was somewhat of a Yankee-killer at that time.
  4. Integration — Carl played through the era when baseball became integrated — when Jackie Robinson entered the National League, and Larry Doby entered the American League. Carl faced Doby on a number of occasions, and usually didn’t do too well against him. The A’s hired a heckler to harass Doby when he was in Philadelphia. Some of it was good-natured, but a lot of it was shameful and mean. In fact, Carl related in the book that the other players were hard on the African-American players, treating them very badly. Carl felt sorry for them.
  5. All-Time Greats — Carl got to meet some of the all-time great ballplayers.  He was coached by Chief Bender, and Al Simmons. He also met Babe Ruth during Connie Mack’s celebration of 50 years in baseball. So, Carl interacted with some of the greatest old-time ballplayers.
  6. Opponents — Carl played against some of the greatest players of all time during baseball’s golden era, and often got the better of them. He faced Ted Williams, Joe Dimaggio, Yogi Berra, Larry Doby, Mickey Mantle, and many more. On the mound, his opponents were Satchel Paige, Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Hal Newhouser, and others.
  7. Did Great Things — Carl threw complete game shutouts, hit a grand slam against the White Sox, hit four other major league homeruns, had many clutch wins and saves, and even clutch hits as a batter.
  8. Good hitter — Carl was a good-hitting pitcher. He could have been an outfielder, and played in the outfield in a couple games. He was also a key pinch hitter. One year he hit .396 — in over 50 at bats — in the major leagues.  This is tough to do! He was a lifetime .250 hitter. One game in particular made me laugh. It was really remarkable. Carl was pitching a complete game. It was tied into the bottom of the 9th. With a couple men on base, guess who came up to bat — Carl. Now, these days, how likely is it that a manager is going to allow the pitcher to bat in the bottom of the 9th of a tie game. This doesn’t happen anymore!  Ever!  So, Carl is allowed to bat, and what does he do? He gets the game-winning walk-off hit!  I looked into this a little bit, and I don’t know of any other instances where a starting pitcher, throwing a complete game, has the walk-off hit to end the game. It certainly hasn’t happened in quite awhile, if at all.  Admittedly, I didn’t look too hard, but it is remarkable nonetheless.  In another game, in the minor leagues, near the end of his career, the manager was thrown out of the game for some reason, and Carl being one of the older players on the team, was asked to manage the rest of the way.  Along comes the bottom of the 9th, and the game is tied. There are a couple of men on. Guess who Carl, the manager, inserts as a pinch-hitter? Himself! And, guess what he did? He got a hit – a walk-off hit to win the game.

So, in summary, Carl was simply a great country ballplayer. On better teams, or with better management, or modern technology, I am sure he would have had an even better, and perhaps longer career. Carl truly was and is the “Wonder Boy” from Gratz!

Thank you ….

“Hass” Hassenger then spoke for a few minutes. He is the only other surviving member from the Gratz HS championship teams. He reminisced about the old days when they were boys playing ball in the valley.

Carl Scheib then answered questions and told jokes and stories for about 45 minutes.

(The entire program was recorded on video by The Gratz Historical Society and is available on DVD from them.)

Copies of the book Wonder Boy, and all other Sunbury Press books can be purchased wherever books are sold. A few signed copies will be offered by The Gratz Historical Society while supplies last. The book can also be purchased directly from Sunbury Press at:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Wonder-Boy-The-Story-of-Carl-Scheib-9781620064139.htm