Monthly Archives: February 2015

Civil War reenactors travel time to right a wrong they caused during their last visit to 1863

GETTYSBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released The Death Machine, Charles K. Godfrey’s sequel to the bestsellingThe Final Charge.

About the Book:
tdm_fc
The Death Machine
is the sequel to The Final Charge, the story of Mike, Ray, and Gordon, three Civil War reenactors, who accidentally time traveled to Gettysburg in July, 1863. They took part in Pickett’s Charge and, at the end, when they made it home, they discovered they had somehow changed history.

The characters find themselves in a wonderful new world, but underneath its facade, there exists an evil that continues to grow. One of the characters is murdered, and the others risk their lives, traveling through time again to try to reset the timeline. This involves stopping a secret weapon that could foil their plans.

Excerpt:
Friday, July 3, 1863
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

It was a sultry 90-degree day. The sky rained hot metal down on the men crossing the Emmitsburg Road. Double canister tore through the Confederate rank and file every step of the way. Pickett’s Charge was in its final minutes as the Confederates dashed toward the stone wall at the area known as the Angle. In the oppressive heat of the day and the dense smoke of cannon fire, Armistead’s Confederate brigade passed through the two decimated brigades of Garnett and Kemper that were at the front.

With the stench of sulfur in their mouths and nostrils, the men of the Ninth Virginia Regiment headed for the stone wall, right where Lieutenant Cushing’s Fourth U.S. Light Artillery was located. Lieutenant Cushing had his men push the two cannons down to the stone wall to greet the oncoming Confederates. Sergeant Fuger was at his side and in the process of loading the guns when Lt. Cushing was hit in the groin by a piece of shrapnel. Lt. Cushing fell against the gun and slid to the ground, holding his wound.

Sergeant Fuger rushed to his side. “Lon, you okay?” He saw Lt. Cushing’s guts protruding from his wound and he called for the medical stewards. When the stewards got there, Cushing waved them off.

“Please, Fred, help me up,” Cushing asked.

Sergeant Fuger helped him to his feet and with the Confederates coming over the wall, Lt. Cushing grabbed his sergeant by the lapel. “Give them double canister.”

“Let ‘em have it!” Sergeant Fuger yelled.

Unbeknownst to Cushing, the gunners were killed before they could get the shots off. Seeing the bayonets coming his way, Lt. Cushing yelled, “Fire the damn–“

At that very moment, a Minié ball entered his mouth and blew out the back of his head. He fell from the sergeant’s arms to the ground, dead.

After witnessing the death of Lt. Cushing, Sergeant Fuger turned his attention to the Confederates coming over the wall. He pulled the lanyard. The discharge was devastating. Hell seemed to be cut loose on the remaining Confederates inside the Angle.

The smoke was so thick and the noise so loud that confusion gripped the battlefield. The two sides struggled and fought in deadly hand-to-hand combat. Men picked up rocks and threw them at each other. Cushing’s battery was overrun and the Confederate flags were going up over the stone wall.

Union General Webb, seeing the hole punched into the lines, put in reinforcements at the Angle and the tide soon turned. The Confederates were driven back. One by one, the men in butternut and gray were on the retreat.

The battle was over, but the carnage remained. Smoke boiled up from the battlefield along with the sickening stench of death that filled the air.

Wounded men from both sides begged for water, while the horses writhed in their death rattles. It was the true picture of butchery and death. Pickett’s Charge was over.

About the Author:
CKGodfreyCharles K. Godfrey started out in Baltimore County Fire Department as a Firefighter and was quickly promoted to Paramedic. He was promoted to Lieutenant and served the Fire Investigation unit. He retired as a Fire Lieutenant with 27 years’ service.

During this time, as a hobby, he reenacted the Civil War with the First Maryland Volunteer Infantry Regiment. For more than twenty years, he participated in the reenactments of Gettysburg, Manassas, Cedar Creek, and many others, including living history events at Fort McHenry and Harpers Ferry. He took part in the 150th ceremonies at Gettysburg.

He is a history buff that likes to blend fiction with history. In addition, he is enthusiastic about science fiction and loves the idea of time travel. He resides in northern Baltimore County with his wife of 40 years.

The Death Machine
Authored by Charles K Godfrey
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
238 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065754
ISBN-10: 1620065754
BISAC: Fiction / Historical

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Death-Machine-978162…

Celtic Prince Caratacus rallies the tribes of Britain to face the invading Romans

SPOKANE, Wash.Sunbury Press has released The Wolf of Britannia, Jess Steven Hughes’ prequel to the bestsellingThe Sign of the Eagle. The novel has been released in two parts.

About the Part I:
twob1_fcThe Wolf of Britannia, Part I, is a breathtaking historical novel of action and suspense set in the wilds of First Century AD Britain. A young Celtic warrior, soon-to-be-legendary Prince Caratacus, must unite the southern tribes of Britain to fight an enemy more cunning and powerful than either he or Britain has ever faced, the juggernaut of imperial Rome.

As the prince fights alongside his wife, Rhian, a warrior princess who takes no prisoners, Caratacus must also outsmart a traitorous brother determined to take the throne with the support of Rome.

The Wolf of Britannia, Part I, is the story of a courageous man who must save his country not only from internal strife and treachery, but from the tyranny of Rome or die trying.

Excerpt:
Caratacus’s wicker chariot bucked and hurtled across every dip and rise in the track. Two lathering ponies strained at their harness as the young prince urged them ahead. Man-sized wooden targets sprinkled the course. Caratacus struck each through the heart with his casting spears. Now he raced for the finish line in a swirl of chalky dust, blue eyes ablaze with excitement.

Tawny hair whipped about his sunburned face. He sweated profusely in a woolen, short-sleeved tunic and tartan breeches, dust muting their colors. A gold collar burned his neck, but to rip it off would bring bad luck. The earthy musk of horse sweat blotted out all other odors.

Behind him, clattering wheels and thudding hooves roared in his ears. Four other chariots steadily gained on him. His horses responded to the stinging touch as he slapped the reins. Caratacus leaped from the flimsy cart onto the center drawbar between his team when another chariot nosed into the lead. He struggled for a foothold and looped the dragging reins about his wrists. Barefooted, he deftly edged his way forward on the jouncing bar and catapulted onto the back of his favorite beast. Kneeling on the bay pony, he bellowed encouragement, calling for even greater speed.

Sucking dust and screaming, urging the racers to ever greater strides, throngs of men, women, and children circled the large, rutted oval, which served as a race track below the great hill fortress of Camulodunum.

A small boy chasing a dog darted from the crowd and crossed in the front of Caratacus’s path. A woman screamed. He sucked in his breath—Damn! In a flash he kicked the pony’s side, sharply swerving the team, barely missing the child. The chariot bounced, arcing one wheel off the ground and back to the earth with a thud. Violently wrenched from the beast’s back, Caratacus grabbed its yoke collar and yanked himself up on the withers. A throbbing pain shot through his loins from where he caught the horse’s knotty backbone between his legs.

For an instant, Caratacus glanced at the jostling throng. He caught sight of flaxen-haired Rhian, daughter of the king’s champion. The young woman screamed encouragement. His team leaped ahead and stampeded towards the finish.

Caratacus heard a pop and then a rumbling noise. He turned and saw the left trace rein on his other pony had snapped loose from an iron holding lug. It whipped back and forth along the animal’s side. The mare squealed, terrified by the bridle’s lashing. She strained at leather bands around her girth and neck, trying to lurch free of the yoke collar.

About the Part II:
twob2_fcThe Wolf of Britannia, Part II, is a breathtaking historical novel of action and suspense set in the years between 43 and 60 AD, in the mysterious land of ancient Britain and the majestic palaces of Rome. In the first millennium’s early days, the Romans held power over most of the world’s people through disciplined savagery, yet many citizens fought to break from tyranny. This painstaking researched tale is of one such fight for freedom.

In the wilds of Britain, the soon-to-be-legendary King Caratacus and his tribe of Celtic warriors are facing down the seemingly unbeatable Roman army.

After winning the southern British throne, Caratacus leads his people as they strive for freedom from the iron-fisted Roman rule that has nearly obliterated their culture and lifestyle. As the king fights to keep his people free, he must also battle his beautiful, conniving, and lascivious cousin−a queen who wants Caratacus for herself. The Wolf of Britannia, Part II, is the story of one daring man, willing to risk his life to destroy the entire Roman army.

About the Author:
Jess Steven (Steve) Hughes portraitJess Steven Hughes brought his lifetime’s fascination with ancient Roman history into his debut novel, THE SIGN OF THE EAGLE. Jess is a retired a police detective sergeant, Long Beach Police Dept, Long Beach, CA. He holds a Masters Degree from the University of Southern California in Public Administration with a minor (my first academic love) in Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations. He also served four years United States Marine Corps (1962/66). As a retired person, Jess believes in keeping very busy. You must stay active mentally, physically and socially. These are a few of the keys to a long and healthy retirement. Writing novels has contribute greatly to my quality of life. He lives with his wife, Liz, on a four acre mini-farm in Eastern Washington. His hobby is outdoor model railroading. He has an outdoor model railroad that was featured in the June/July, 2010 issue of the regional magazine PRIME NORTHWEST (www.primenw.com). Check their website for the article.

Jess is a member of the Pacific Northwest Writers Association (PNWA), the Public Safety Writers Association (PSWA) and is active in two writers groups in the Spokane, WA area (Spokane Novelists and Spokane Valley Writers).

The Wolf of Britannia Part I
Authored by Jess Steven Hughes
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
328 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065600
ISBN-10: 1620065606
BISAC: Fiction / Historical

The Wolf of Britannia Part II
Authored by Jess Steven Hughes
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
264 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065631
ISBN-10: 1620065630
BISAC: Fiction / Historical

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Wolf-of-Britannia-Pa…

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Wolf-of-Britannia-Pa…